RCSI Lab Safari 2018

During science week 2018 MCT ran its RCSI Lab Safari, an outreach event for 45 students from St Dominic’s College in Ballyfermot. The day provided students with an opportunity to gain an insight into careers in biomedical research and health care and also provide some hands-on experience of the types of skills involved in these careers.

The event was developed to promote careers in STEMM (Science, Technology, Engineering, Maths and Medicine) to younger, second and third year students, who have yet to choose their leaving cert subjects. Participants experienced a whole day of activities around the scientific method, patient simulations and hands on laboratory demonstrations in the areas of genetics, vascular and musculoskeletal biology. They also had the opportunity to discuss career options with MCT scientists. A video which captures the activities on day is here.

MCT would like to thanks the Students, Staff & Principal of St Dominic’s College, Ballyfermot for their enthusiastic involvement.

RCSI Lab Safari was developed and led by Dr Maria Morgan and Dr Annie Curtis from the Molecular & Cellular Therapeutics Department (MCT) and was funded through the L’Oréal Ambassadors Fund. The initiative was an interdepartmental collaboration with support from staff across RCSI and included: Presentations from Prof. Tracy Robson and Caragh Stapleton; Interviewing by Isabel Amado; Research Lab Experience Leads: Caragh Stapleton, Jamie O’Sullivan’ Oran Kennedy; Simulation & Clinics Skills Event led by Clare Sullivan and Tim Lawler; Research Lab Experience Demonstrators: Katie Benson, Paige Hinton, Lauren Fagan, Isabel Amado, Richie Carroll, Soracha Ward, Hannah Rushe, Clive Drakeford, Sean Patmore, Ed Gilbert, Rob Carton, Ciaran Campbell, Gillian Moore; Professional & Technical Staff: Anne Grady, Mary Ledwith, Seamus McDonald, John O’Brien, Olwen Foley.

MCT Research Forum

Monday 14th January 12.00 – 1.30

Drug Discovery and Development

Prof. Celine Marmion

‘Teaching an Old Drug New Tricks – Developing Multi-Targeted Metallodrug Candidates Beyond Cisplatin’

Prof. Dermot Cox

Challenges in developing small molecule drugs

Hannah Rushe

‘Novel therapeutics to prevent uncontrolled bleeding’

Lunch sponsored by Bioscience at 1.30pm

Venue: Cheyne Lecture Theatre

Merry Christmas!

Dear All,

It’s been another very successful year for MCT. May I take the opportunity to thank you all for your hard work, you’ve all been a real pleasure to work with and I am grateful for your tremendous efforts and dedication this year. Now it’s time to relax with your family and friends over the Christmas break.

Best wishes for a peaceful Christmas and a Happy New Year filled with health, happiness and more spectacular success!!!!

Best wishes,

Tracy Robson

Professor & Head of Molecular & Cellular Therapeutics (MCT)

Ancestral origins of increased breast cancer risk and mortality: blame the parents

MCT Research Seminars – 19th December 2018

Leena A. Hilakivi-Clarke, Ph.D. is a professor of Oncology at Georgetown University. She received PhD in 1987 from University of Helsinki, Finland, where she studied the role of maternal exposures during pregnancy in affecting offspring’s later brain development and behaviour. Next, she was a Fogarty postdoctoral fellow (1987-1990) at the National Institute of Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism in Bethesda, Maryland. In 1991, she joined the Lombardi Comprehensive Cancer Center at Georgetown University, Washington DC. Since then, Dr. Hilakivi-Clarke has been investigating how maternal dietary exposures or exposures to the endocrine-disrupting chemical during pregnancy affect daughter’s breast cancer risk, response to endocrine therapy and risk of recurrence. She discovered that the effects of maternal exposures are not limited to F1 generation but extend to at least F3 generation (great granddaughters). In addition, she has studied the effect of these exposures on mother’s breast cancer risk as well as the impact of childhood exposures on breast cancer risk and recurrence. Exposures include ethinyl estradiol, plant-derived phytochemicals, dietary fats and obesity. Her current goals include being able to identify breast cancer patients who have been ancestrally exposed to factors that may impair their response to endocrine therapy and/or increase their risk of recurrence using their pretreatment tumours. She is also exploring combination therapies, including HDAC/DNMT inhibitors and immune therapies that would prevent recurrence in daughters ancestrally exposed to factors that impair their response to antiestrogens. Her publication record consists of over 160 journal articles. She is a recipient of multiple grant awards through her research career, including being a program director for NCI funded U54 program project entitled “Timing of dietary exposures and breast cancer risk” to investigate nutritional modulation of genetic pathways leading to breast cancer.

Time: 1.00pm – 2.00pm

Venue: Bouchier-Hayes Auditorium, No 26 York St

Lunch will be at 12.30 outside the Auditorium

All Welcome!

Congratulations to Remsha Afzal!

The Molecular & Computational Biology Symposium 2018 was held at the Conway Institute of Biomolecular and Biomedical Research in University College Dublin (UCD). This symposium is jointly organised annually by UCD PhD students from the Systems Biology and Infection Biology programs.

This event showcased the thriving local research and scientific community that is present at UCD and in Dublin to Irish and international academic researchers as well as industrial companies. It also featured internationally renowned keynote speakers from a wide range of fields within the sphere of computational and molecular biology to present their research.

Remsha Afzal from Dr. Claire McCoy’s lab was selected to be a speaker at this year’s symposium where she won a prize for best presentation for her topic “The role of IL-10 and arginase in immunometabolism”

See more about the symposium at: http://compmolbiosymp.ucd.ie/

PhD student elevator pitch session

Chairs: Thomas Frawley and Orla Fox

Venue: Houston Lecture Theatre

Date: December, 3d 2018

Time: 12.00

Presenters: 

Rebecca Watkin

George Timmons

Aisling Rehill

Hannah Rushe

Remsha Afzal

Conor Duffy

Martin Kenny

Frances Nally

Sean Patmore

James O’Siorain

Shannon Cox

Lauren Fagan

A light lunch will be served after the talks. Sponsored by Biosciences Ltd.

All Welcome!

 

Omics in Disease Diagnosis and Therapy

Our new ‘thematic’ MCT Research Seminar Series was launched on November 8th with the opening talks on ‘Omics in Disease Diagnosis and Therapy’. The aim of the new format, with presentations spanning several research groups and diseases to facilitate knowledge exchange and foster cross-collaboration.

Dr Sudipto Das – Genomic and epigenomic approaches as a vital discovery platform

The talk broadly focused on various genomic and epigenomic platforms that have been established in the lab enabling us to interrogate the various alterations that underpin disease-associated features. Using specific clinical case examples, the talk demonstrated how the whole genome, exome and shallow sequencing have allowed us to further our understanding about atypical clinical presentation of known cancer types. Furthermore, the application of targeted methylation sequencing on FFPE tissue and it’s further utilization to stratify metastatic colorectal and heart failure patients using deep learning approaches was also explained.

Dr Katie Benson – Integrating Genomics into the Clinical Care Pathway

Next-generation sequencing is quickly replacing single gene tests in clinical practice. The integration of these genomic tests has been slow as a result of barriers including data processing and interpretation, handling of incidental findings, storage of data and access to genetics services and clinical geneticists. The Epilepsy Lighthouse project, building on the success of the epilepsy electronic patient record (EPR), has used eHealth technologies to facilitate the integration of genomics results into the epilepsy clinic. This has facilitated multidisciplinary team discussions of patients and their genomics results. As part of this project, we have sequenced 97 adult and paediatric Irish epilepsy patients and successfully provided a genetic diagnosis in 24% of cases.

Dr Chiara DeSanti – MicroRNA function in health and disease

Since the sequencing of the human genome back in 2001, non-coding RNAs have been shown to play a critical role in regulating gene expression at a transcriptional, post-transcriptional and translational level. Among the several classes of non-coding RNAs, our group is interested in microRNAs (miRNAs), small non-coding RNA molecules (18-25 nt in length) firstly discovered in C.elegans as negative regulator of gene expression through binding to the 3’untranslated region (UTR) of a target mRNA and inhibiting its translation and/or leading to mRNA degradation. MiRNAs expression was found altered in all human diseases so far, where they have been proposed as diagnostic/prognostic biomarkers and as key players in the pathogenic process itself due to their pleiotropic ability to bind hundreds of mRNAs simultaneously. Therefore, it’s hugely important to define true miRNAs::mRNAs interactions to understand their biological role and the pathways that they affect, in the overall aim of designing therapeutic strategies to enhance or block miRNAs. In order to do so, online target predictions is usually the first step, but experimental validation is needed to verify the in silico-predicted interaction. Several methods have been developed to address this issue, and they can be indirect (i.e. transcriptomic and proteomic changes are measured after over-expression/depletion of a miRNA), or direct (i.e. miRNA::mRNA complexes are captured and physical interactions are assessed, including the RCSI-developed method called miR-CATCH). Gold standard for the validation of high-throughput screening is the luciferase assay, again routinely used in several laboratories across the College. In our group, we are focussing on the role of miR-155 in macrophage polarisation in the context of multiple sclerosis (MS), a neurodegenerative disease where proinflammatory macrophages infiltrate the central nervous system and promote chronic inflammation and damage to myelin sheath. Our hypothesis, supported by preliminary data by our PI Dr MCoy and other researchers, is that miR-155 is promoting the proinflammatory state in macrophages and therefore blocking it would reduce inflammation and alleviate disease progression. Although proof of concepts for antimiR-155 therapy have been attempted in a mouse model of MS (EAE model), we are hoping to boost its efficacy by improving the delivery to macrophages of more stable versions of antimiR-155 or target-site blockers that minimise off-targets effects.

 

 

 

Gut Feelings: The Microbiome as a Regulator of Brain and Behaviour across the Lifespan

MCT Research Seminars – November 19th,  2018.

Ever had a “gut feeling” about something? It turns out, the connection between our gut and our brain might be stronger than we think. John F. Cryan, Prof. & Chair of Anatomy & Neuroscience and Principal Investigator at APC Microbiome Ireland, Cork Ireland will share surprising facts and insights about how our thoughts and emotions are connected to our guts. As a TEDMED speaker, Prof. Cryan shares his fascination with biomedicine and why it offers a perfect way to explore the interaction between the brain, gut and microbiome, and how this relationship applies to stress- and immune-related disorders such as depression, anxiety, irritable bowel syndrome, obesity, and neurodevelopmental disorders including autism.

Prof. Cryan has published over 440 articles and is a co-author of “The Psychobiotic Revolution: Mood, Food, and the New Science of the Gut-Brain Connection” (National Geographic Press, 2017). He has received numerous awards including UCC Researcher of the Year in 2012; UCC Research Communicator of the Year 2017, the University of Utrecht Award for Excellence in Pharmaceutical Research in 2013 and being named on the Thomson Reuters Highly Cited Researcher list in 2014 and Clarivate Analytics Highly Cited Researcher list in 2017 and 2018. He was elected a Member of the Royal Irish Academy in 2017. He has received a Research Mentor Award from the American Gastroenterology Association and the Tom Connor Distinguished Scientist Award from Neuroscience Ireland in 2017. He was awarded an Honorary Degree from the University of Antwerp, Belgium in 2018 and is currently President of the European Behavioural Pharmacology Society.

Date: November, 19th 2018

Time: 3.00pm

Venue: Tutorial Room 4

All Welcome

Well done Dr Mariana Cervantes!

Dr Mariana Cervantes (MCT) was successful in obtaining funding from The National Council of Science and Technology (CONACYT) from Mexico under the Support for Postdoctoral Researchers Abroad Linked to the Consolidation of Research Groups scheme. This funding will support her postdoctoral research in circadian biology in the Curtis-Clock Lab, under the guidance of Dr Annie Curtis. The grant titled “Impact of circadian control on mitochondrial metabolism in Dendritic Cells and their implications in vaccination” was funded for $48,000 for 2 years. In this project, Dr. Cervantes will unravel the mechanisms by which the molecular clock regulates dendritic cell function with the objective to improve vaccination strategies.

This grant is awarded to Mexican Postdoctoral researchers who wish to carry out high-level research in prestigious universities worldwide.

MCT Scopes Awards at Haematology Association of Ireland Meeting 2018

MCT was well represented at this year’s Haematology Association of Ireland meeting in Cork. A number of PhD students and Post-docs from the Irish Centre for Vascular Biology, has their work selected for presentation at this prestigious annual meeting. Moreover, three of these presentations were awarded prizes;

Presidents Prize: Clive Drakeford, PhD student
Best Scientific Oral Presentation: Dr Sean McCluskey, PostDoc
Best Scientific Poster Presentation: Soracha Ward, PhD student

Soracha Ward (PhD student with Prof. James O’Donnell) presenting her poster

Additionally, two PhD students, Sean Patmore and Aisling Rehill, scored in the top 20% of submitted abstracts and had their work selected for oral presentations at the meeting.

Dr. Sean McCluskey [post doc with Roger Preston] and Clive Drafeford [student with Prof. James O’Donnell]
Congratulations to all involved!