Using genotype data to infer population structure and history

MCT Research Talk – 12th December

The Human Genetic Variation Research Group 

The Monday 12th December MCT Seminar Series will feature presentations from Amy Cole and Edmund Gilbert, of the Human Genetic Variation Research Group at RCSI. Led by Prof. Gianpiero Cavalleri, this research group studies large genetic datasets to investigate population structure, natural selection and the genetic basis of human disease.

Andean native in a small village on the outskirts of Cuzco

Amy Cole’s research focuses on identifying adaptive genetic variants in high altitude populations.  There are more than 140 million people living at high altitude who are exposed to two primary environmental extremes; hypobaric hypoxia and cold. At altitudes >2500 m individuals have between 11-14% effective oxygen availability, instead of the 21% available at sea level. Previous studies have identified genetic signals of selection across the genome, which have facilitated an adaptive phenotype for survival in this hypoxic environment.  Studying these indigenous high altitude populations will enable us to shed light on genes and molecular mechanisms involved in the response to hypoxia. This insight can help shed light on a number of illnesses associated with hypoxic states in low altitude populations, such as pneumonia, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, asthma and cancer.

Research group en route to Cerro de Pasco

Today Amy presented research on a whole genome sequencing project on native high altitude Quechua individuals, recruited from the city of Cerro de Pasco, Peru, during a field trip in 2015.  Amy recently completed a three-month lab placement at MD Anderson Cancer Center with Professor Chad Huff’s research group. Here Amy performed a number of computational analyses to identify regions of the genome that are under selection in this cohort.

Edmund Gilbert’s research involves investigating the genetic structure and diversity found within the Irish. As an island population on the west of Europe, the Irish population is, from the genetic perspective, relatively homogenous compared to populations of the European mainland. As a results of this elevated homogeneity, the Irish population is well suited to studies of genetic disease. Such studies have recently shifted focus towards rare variants, which are more geographically stratified than more common variants. Therefore understanding the population structure within Ireland is key for the optimal design of genetic disease causing rare variant identification within the Irish.

Today Edmund will be presenting research investigating the extent of fine-scale population structure found within Ireland. He has been using SNP-array genotype data from the genetic ancestry DNA cohort called the “Irish DNA Atlas”. The Atlas is a cohort of individuals with Irish ancestry from three generations ago who have all eight of their great-grandparents born within 50 km. Edmund will be presenting analysis based on the suite of software known as fineStructure; investigating both fine-scale structure as well as the genetic ancestry of this structure.

Amy Cole, Edmund Gilbert, Gianpiero Cavalleri