The role of the anorectic neuropeptide CART in breast cancer

MCT Research Talks – 16th January 2017

Breast cancer currently affects 1 in 8 women in Ireland, with over 3000 reported cases each year. The most common subtype of breast cancer, known as Estrogen Receptor positive (ER+) breast cancer, accounts for roughly 70% of all breast cancers diagnosed. The most common drug used to treat this disease (Tamoxifen) works by preventing estrogen from driving the growth of the cancer cells, however, roughly 1 in 3 women will be resistant to tamoxifen treatment, highlighting the need for further research into this field. A number of years ago, though mining of publically available datasets, we identified a gene known as CART to be a marker of poor prognosis in ER+ breast cancer. CART (The Cocaine- and Amphetamine-Regulated Transcript) is a neuropeptide involved in processes such as feeding and drug reward. We have identified that high expression of CART in breast cancer patients correlates with poor overall survival, and also a poor response to tamoxifen. We also demonstrated that CART could influence the activity of ERα in a ligand-independent manner [1]. Our current research focuses on combining proteomic (mass-spectrometry) and transcriptomic (RNA-seq) approaches in order to fully understand the role CART plays in ER+ breast cancer. We aim to modulate the expression of these identified targets in order to investigate whether any of these targets could slow the growth of breast cancer cells in vitro. Combining these approaches, we hope to identify novel therapeutic opportunities for patients with ER+ breast cancer.

Recommended reading:

[1] DJ Brennan, DP O’Connor et al., The Cocaine- and Amphetamine-Regulated Transcript mediates ligand-independent activation of ERα, and is an independent prognostic factor in node-negative breast cancer. Oncogene 2012, 31, 3483–3494; doi:10.1038/onc.2011.519

Brian Mooney, Darran O’Connor