The Immune-Clock laboratory of Dr. Annie Curtis, a recent recruit to RCSI

MCT Research Talks – 30th January 2017

Last week’s departmental talks encompassed a Deep Dive into Clock biology in Macrophages affecting the Inflammatory Response. This area is the focus of the Immune-Clock laboratory of Dr. Annie Curtis, a recent recruit to RCSI.

Jamie Early, my PhD student

Jamie Early (PhD student of the Curtis Lab) currently residing in the Luke O’Neill Laboratory presented his findings on the role of the circadian clock in suppressing inflammation in macrophages and if the anti-oxidant transcription factor and redox sensor NRF2 plays a role. His talk was titled ‘The macrophage clock is a key controller of the anti-oxidant and inflammatory response via the transcription factor Nrf2’.

Second up, we had Mariana Cervantes (PhD student and visiting scientist from the Instituto Politecnico Nacional (IPN) in Mexico) present her talk titled ‘The macrophage clock is having a profound impact on mitochondrial dynamics- what are the implications for inflammation?’

Mariana Cervantes

Mariana is interested in how mitochondria alter their morphology, either fusing together to form networks or fragmenting into smaller units termed fission. She is trying to uncover if the clock is regulating this process and if so what are the implications for the inflammatory response.

This work is part of a collaboration between RCSI and  Luke O’Neill laboratory at TCD and is funded through Science Foundation Ireland