Daffodil Day Bake sale – 24/03/2017

Daffodil day is marked on the annual calendar as one of the most significant days recognised for collecting donations from the Irish public to fund cancer research as well as various services provided by the Irish Cancer Society. Given the substantial amount of cancer researchers based in RCSI and in particular in MCT, a joint effort between the MCT and the Department of Physiology and Medical Physics was carried out to organise a “Bake sale” aimed to raise funds on this occasion. Dr. Sudipto Das (MCT) and Dr. Catriona Dowling (Physiology and Medical Physics) primarily organised the bake sale.

This year bake sale boasted a wide variety of baked goods prepared by various members of the staff including senior researchers and post-graduate students. One the main highlights of the bake sale was an auction for an exquisite chocolate biscuit cake with a daffodil theme baked by Ms. Ina Woods (Physiology and Medical Physics). The auction was successfully completed by selling the cake at the highest bid of 50 euro by Prof. Jochen Prehn. This year bake sale was a highly successful event, which effectively raised 800 euro with all proceeding going towards the Irish Cancer Society.

We thank everyone who made this fundraising event into an enjoyable and fruitful event.

 Reported by Sudipto Das

International Research and Education

Prof Tracy Robson (MCT), Prof Jochen Prehn (Physiology & Medical Physics) and Dr Darran O’Connor (MCT) have recently returned from 1 week at the College of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Soochow University, Suzhou, China where they participated in a workshop with faculty to explore research collaborations and future joint funding applications under the newly announced SFI-NSF Partnerships for International Research and Education. Supported by an Erasmus+ programme coordinated by Prof Marc Devocelle (Department of Pharmaceutical and Medicinal Chemistry), the workshop involved presentations from RCSI and Soochow investigators describing their work and discussion to identify areas of synergy. Afternoon lectures by RCSI faculty were opened to postgraduate and postdoctoral researchers from Soochow, leading to a vigorous and stimulating discussion and Prof Xinliang Mao from Soochow will visit RCSI next month to further strengthen future collaborative research opportunities. 

Left to Right: Prof Tracy Robson (MCT), Prof Jochen Prehn (Physiology & Medical Physics) and Dr Darran O’Connor (MCT)

At the invitation of the President of the British Pharmacological Society, Professor John Waddington (Emeritus, RCSI) has been elected to Fellowship of the Society; this is in recognition of his career contributions to research, education and service in the discipline of pharmacology, not just in Ireland but globally. He has recently returned from 3 weeks at the College of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Soochow University, China, under his joint appointment as a Professor of Pharmacology. While there, he continued collaborative research, gave undergraduate lectures and fostered further joint endeavours between RCSI and Soochow University, which is in the top 5% of Chinese research universities.   

Tracy Robson

The Time Evolution of Shear-Induced Particle Margination and Migration in Flowing Blood

MCT Research Talks – 24th March 2017

Prof. Eric S. G. Shaqfeh, Qin M. Qi, Departments of Chemical and of Mechanical Engineering, Stanford University

The inhomogeneous center-of-mass distribution of red blood cells and platelets normal to the flow direction in small vessels plays a significant role in hemostasis, drug delivery and microfluidics. Under pressure-driven flow in channels, the migration of deformable red blood cells at steady state is characterised by a concentration peak at the channel center and a cell-free layer or Fahraeus-Lindqvist layer near the vessel wall.

Eric Stefan G. Shaqfeh

Rigid particles such as platelets, however, “marginate” and thus develop a near-wall excess concentration. This margination controls the time it takes for the initial stages of platelet binding and clotting in response to trauma.
In this talk, we investigate the time-dependent concentration distribution of red blood cells and platelets in pressure-driven flow by developing and solving a Boltzmann model, advection-diffusion equation for both species. From a fluid mechanics point of view, deformability-induced hydrodynamic lift and shear-induced diffusion are essential mechanisms for the cross-flow particle migration and margination. The governing equation for the distribution of red blood cells includes both lift flux away from the wall and shear-induced diffusion due to cell-cell “collisions”. On the other hand, the governing transport equation for platelets includes shear-induced diffusion from cell-platelet “collisions” and platelet-platelet “collisions”. We demonstrate that these predictions are in good agreement with full boundary element simulations of the margination process and we also compare directly to experimental results. We then examine, within this model and our full boundary element simulations, the time evolution and “entrance length” for red blood cell migration and platelet margination. The resulting complete model can serve as a fast and computationally efficient alternative to large-scale simulation with the application, for example, as a real-time computational tool for microfluidic blood assay systems.

A novel platelet function test (The Platelet Monitoring Biochip)

MCT Research Talks –13th March 2017 

Jonathan Cowman reports

Cardiovascular disease (CVD) is the leading cause of death and disability in the world (approx. 1.9 million deaths per year within the EU). Platelet’s play a key role in this process and hence is why antiplatelet therapy such as aspirin is effective in reducing its incidences. Platelet function testing has a role in identifying those that are at high risk of a CVD related event (example a heart attack) and also identifying those patients that do not respond to their medication. There are a number of platelet function tests on the market however these tests suffer from a number of disadvantages such as expense, high sample volume, requirement for trained lab personal and single drug test capability.

Jonathan Cowman

My current research under the supervision of Prof. Dermot Kenny (RCSI) and Dr. Niamh Gilmartin (DCU and DIT) is to work alongside our multi-disciplinary team to produce a cost effective, rapid, small sample volume platelet function assay which can detect the effect of multiple antiplatelet drugs in a single patient blood sample. The project is known as the Platelet Monitoring Biochip (PMB). The PMB device consists of 6 micron sized fibrinogen dots, which are micro contact printed to a Zeonor (plastic) surface, a bright-field imaging system and a custom designed platelet analysis software. Blood is added to the device and rocked for 30 minutes to allow platelets to adhere to the fibrinogen dots. The device has 3 channels, a control (no agonist well), an adenosine diphosphate (ADP) well and an Arachidonic acid (AA) well which can be used to detect P2Y12 platelet inhibition and aspirin effect simultaneously. The PMB device provides a fast, easy and low cost way to determine the effectively of antiplatelet therapy against multiple agonists in whole blood. The device is currently in operation in RCSI Beaumont.

MCT Awards at Research Day 2017

Dear all,

MCT was well represented in the award ceremony at the recent Research Day; our congratulations go to the following:

Dr Mark McCormack, for receiving prizes in the RCSI Author Citations Prizes in two categories – the 2011 Most Highly Cited RCSI Senior Authored Paper and the 2011-2015 Most Highly Cited RCSI Senior Authored Paper with International Collaboration – for his paper entitled “HLA-A*3101 and carbamazepine-induced hypersensitivity reactions in Europeans” published in the New England Journal of Medicine.

Dr Cathy Wyse, as part of Dr Annie Curtis’s group, was presented a prize for the front cover illustration of the RCSI Research Day abstract book, for a striking image of glial cells at the junction between the brain and pituitary gland.

Tony McHale, PhD student at the School of Pharmacy, & MCT, and the Irish Centre for Vascular Biology, RCSI received the prize for the best postgraduate oral presentation, for his talk on the topic of “First in Class Potential Novel Drug for the Treatment of Sepsis Caused by Urinary Tract Infections”.

Medical student Jack Donohue [RSS student], was awarded the Dr Harry O’Flanagan Prize for Excellence in Undergraduate Research for the best undergraduate oral presentation for a project carried out as part of the RCSI Research Summer School entitled “Sanger Confirmation of Suspected Epilepsy-Related Pathogenic Variants Identified Through Next-Generation Sequencing”.

Very well done to all!

Tracy Robson