Introducing Jennifer Dowling

I have recently arrived as a Postdoctoral Researcher in Dr Claire McCoys Lab in the Molecular and Cellular Therapeutics Department (MCT) at RSCI. I specialise in immune signalling pathways and inflammatory complexes underlying infectious and inflammatory diseases, including multiple sclerosis (MS), sepsis and highly virulent strains of influenza. 

After obtaining my BSc in Biotechnology in 2005 from Dublin City University I was awarded a postgraduate scholarship from the Irish Research Council and went on to complete my PhD in Immunology in 2009 (DCU). I conducted my postdoctoral training in innate immune signalling with Prof Luke O’Neill in Trinity College Dublin with a strong focus on understanding the mechanisms regulating a key inflammatory complex in immune cells known as the inflammasome.

I was subsequently recruited to the Centre for Innate Immunity and Infectious Diseases at the Hudson Institute of Medical Research, Melbourne, Australia under the supervision of Prof Ashley Mansell and continued my work in this field. Here I secured funding from the Angior Family Foundation to support my research on blocking the detrimental inflammation that occurs during sepsis.

I am excited to be joining MCT and the McCoy Lab. Like Claire, I have a passionate interest in medical research and chose to work in inflammation because it has a central role in the progression of a broad range of diseases. I am also passionate about community engagement, science communication and educating the next generation about the importance of medical research and the role of inflammation in disease.

Jennifer Dowling

Congratulations!

Dear all,

Please join me in sending congratulations to the following staff: Sudipto Das and Jennifer Dowling on their appointment as Honorary Lecturer[s] within MCT, recently approved by Academic Council.

Sudipto Das on the award of best poster presentation in the Post-doctoral researcher category for poster titled “Using next-genera-on sequencing strategies to guide precision oncology in cases with atypical clinical presentation” at the Irish Society for Human Genetics Annual Conference held at Croke Park, Dublin on 15th Sep, 2017.

Jamie Early, student with Annie Curtis, for the best short talk at the Irish Society for Immunology Annual meeting. The title of talk: The circadian clock protein BMAL1 regulates inflammation in macrophages via the NRF2 antioxidant defense pathway”.

And finally to ‘Dr’ Rana Bakhidar PhD, who successfully defended her thesis last week. The title of her thesis is ‘Nanoparticles Used in Drug Delivery and Targeting: Understanding the relationships between Nanoparticle Quality And Interaction With Platelets’. Supervisor: Dr. Sarah O’Neill and Co-supervisor, Dr Zeibun Ramtoola, School of Pharmacy,

Well done to all!
Best wishes,

Tracy

Tracy Robson
Professor & Head of Molecular & Cellular Therapeutics (MCT)