Harnessing FKBPL to target cancer and vascular disease

Pathological blood vessel formation (angiogenesis), or the inability of endothelial cells to perform their physiological function (endothelial dysfunction), are defining features of disease. The endothelium actively controls vessel integrity, vascular growth and remodelling, tissue growth and metabolism, immune responses, cell adhesion, angiogenesis, haemostasis and vascular permeability.  It is, therefore, a vital and largely unexploited target for novel therapies.

Prof Tracy Robson’s team have identified and characterised a novel anti-angiogenic protein, FK506 binding protein like – FKBPL, significantly advancing our understanding of the anti-angiogenic process, in particular, how tumours recruit blood vessels to support their growth. This led to a collaborative study with Almac Discovery to develop therapeutic peptides based on FKBPL’s active domain to explore their potential in cancer by targeting the ability of tumours to recruit blood vessels to grow, invade and metastasise beyond the site of the primary tumour.  The team are also testing the ability of these peptides to sensitise tumours to current therapies and to target cancer stem cells that lead to the onset of resistance and/or recurrent disease.   Importantly, these studies led to a ‘first in man’ phase I clinical in cancer patients where the clinical candidate drug, ALM201, was very well tolerated over a wide range of doses.  Prof Robson’s team (Dr Stephanie Annett and Dr Gillian Moore) will discuss this data together with new data suggesting a strong role for FKBPL in vascular endothelial dysfunction and possible implications therefore in other diseases associated with vascular disease.

Graham Cotton, Tim Harrison, Tracy Robson, Gillian Moore, Seamus Browne and Stephanie Annett (left to right)

Multiple Sclerosis Research Network – 30th May 2018

In honour of World MS Day on the 30 May 2018; the Molecular and Cellular Department in the Royal College of Surgeons Ireland along with Trinity College Dublin, MS Society Ireland and Novartis have joined together to create an MS Research Network event.

The event will comprise of three parts; the first is a World MS Day Fundraiser located in the main foyer of RCSI between 8.30 – 10 am, please come and support the #bringinguscloser campaign. The second is a Researcher Forum for scientists working on MS in Ireland, with the aim to establish an official researcher network to enhance collaboration, visibility, and congeniality. The third is a Public Event to launch the most recent MS Society report and inform the public of the importance and relevance of MS research that is conducted in Ireland.

All are welcome to these events (see below details). To register for the day event, email Harriet Doig at harrietd@ms-society.ie, to register for the evening event, email Emma Kinnane at emma.kinnane@novartis.com.

Written and organised by Claire McCoy

World MS Day Fundraiser – Royal College of Surgeons, Main Foyer. 8.30 – 10am

Researcher Forum – Royal College of Surgeons in Ireland, Tutorial Room 2/3
12.00 Meet and Greet (lunch is provided)
12.30 Harriet Doig (MS Society Ireland). ‘The value of a research network in Ireland’
12.40 Claire McCoy (RCSI). ‘The importance of microRNA-155 in Multiple Sclerosis and my contribution to an MS research network’
13.10 Eric Downer (Trinity College Dublin). ‘Exploring Exercise & Cannabinoids as Therapeutic Targets in MS’
13.40 Una Fitzgerald (NUIG). ‘My research and how I can contribute to an MS research network’

14.15 Tea Break

14.45 Jill Moffat (Queen’s University Belfast). ‘The Northern Ireland MS network – challenges and opportunities’
15.00 Denise Fitzgerald (Queen’s University Belfast) ‘My Research and how the Northern Ireland MS network benefits it’
15.30 Mary Fitzsimons (Beaumont Hospital). ‘How to build an MS electronic patient record, lessons from the epilepsy lighthouse project’
15.45 Alexis Donnelly (Patient advocate). ‘How patients can help build MS research’

Public Event – Trinity Biomedical Sciences Institute, Trinity College Dublin
18.00 MS Society Report Launch
18.20 Clinician – Orla Hardiman (Beaumont Hospital and Trinity College Dublin)
18.40 Researcher – Claire McCoy (RCSI)
19.00 Patient Advocate – Joan Jordan (Patient Advocate)

Development of Novel Treatments for Sepsis

MCT Research Talks

Sepsis is a major challenge in the intensive care unit, where it is one of the leading causes of death. It arises unpredictability and can progress rapidly. Globally there are an estimated 30 million cases of sepsis each year which results in more than 8 million deaths in adults and 5 million deaths in children. Of those who do survive a further one third will die in the following 12 months, those who survive often face life-long consequences, such as new physical, mental and cognitive problems. Although this number is gathered from several sources, all content to the fact that it is likely an underestimate and therefore may very well be the leading cause of mortality worldwide. Currently, there are no approved drugs on the market to control the underlying pathophysiology that triggers the dysregulated host response to sepsis and therefore the management plan focuses on reducing the infection through the use of aggressive intravenous antibiotic therapy and source control. Therefore the cardiovascular infection research group is investigating a therapeutic option that acts early to prevent bacteria binding to the host vascular endothelial cell in the first place would be commercially advantageous as it will prevent the infection from progressing to septic shock and a life-threatening situation as a result of multi-organ failure.

Prof. Steve Kerrigan’s research team

Funded by: Science Foundation Ireland, Enterprise Ireland, Irish Research Council, British Heart Foundation, Health Research Board, Wellcome Trust

Our Educator’s Vision – The White Coat Ceremony

Did you ever wonder what was the significance of the white coat ceremony and what impact it can have on students and faculty who attend?

Dr. Orna Tighe, Dr. Judith Strawbridge, Dr. Alice McGarvey and Prof Hannah McGee explain the evolution of this ceremony at RCSI on the blog of Journal of Interprofessional Care. They touch on the history of the white coat ceremony, it’s associated symbolism, how this ceremony became a tradition in RCSI and has now developed into a unique interprofessional White Coat ceremony, offering an opportunity for multidisciplinary healthcare professionals to develop interprofessional socialization at an early point in their education. The philosophy and the value of this ceremony in RCSI are discussed.

Have a look at some messages from the story and read the original here.

“We recognized that the ceremony needed to be more than just bringing students together and consequently it was developed to ensure that student voice was central, while emphasizing institutional support for interprofessional collaboration”…

“In summary, our experience suggests that the initial power of the white coat metaphor has evolved within RCSI to deliver what is a novel inspirational Interprofessional Ceremony in the very first week of the students’ programs”