A new mechanism by which the body clock controls the inflammatory response from macrophages

The Curtis lab from MCT in partnership with the O’Neill lab at Trinity College have revealed insights into how the body clock controls the inflammatory response, which may open up new therapeutic options to treat excess inflammation in conditions such as asthma, arthritis and cardiovascular disease. By understanding how the body clock controls the inflammatory response, we may be able to target these conditions at certain times of the day to have the most benefit. These findings may also shed light on why individuals who experience body clock disruption such as shift workers are more susceptible to these inflammatory conditions.
The body clock, the timing mechanism in each cell in the body, allows the body to anticipate and respond to the 24-hour external environment. Inflammation is normally a protective process that enables the body to clear infection or damage, however, if left unchecked can lead to disease. The new study published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences (PNAS), a leading international multidisciplinary scientific journal.
Dr Annie Curtis, Research Lecturer in the Department of Molecular and Cellular Therapeutics at RCSI and senior author, explained that: “Macrophages are key immune cells in our bodies which produce this inflammatory response when we are injured or ill. What has become clear in recent years is that these cells react differently depending on the time of day that they face an infection or damage, or when we disrupt the body clock within these cells”.

Some members of the Curtis lab involved in this project: Dr. Richie Carroll (far left), Dr. Annie Curti,  Dr. Mariana Cervantes, George Timmons (far right)

Dr. Jamie Early, the first author on the study, said: “We have made a number of discoveries into the impact of the body clock in macrophages on inflammatory diseases such as asthma and multiple sclerosis. However, the underlying molecular mechanisms by which the body clock precisely controls the inflammatory response were still unclear. Our study shows that the central clock protein, BMAL1 regulates levels of the antioxidant response protein NRF2 to control the inflammatory response from macrophages.
“The findings although at a preliminary stage, offers new insights into the behaviour of inflammatory conditions such as arthritis and cardiovascular disease which are known to be altered by the body clock”, added Dr Early.
Funded by Science Foundation Ireland, the research was undertaken in collaboration between RCSI, Trinity College Dublin and the Broad Institute in Boston, USA.

Here is the  link to the paper titled ” Circadian clock protein BMAL1 regulates IL-1β in macrophages via NRF2

Annie Curtis

RCSI StAR International Summer Internship Programme

This summer RCSI welcomed our very first cohort of ten international students as part of our Inaugural RCSI StAR International Summer Internship Programme. Students came from Washington University, Cornell University, University of California, Berkeley, University of Oregon, Queen’s University Belfast, University of Liverpool and TCD to spend two months in laboratories around RCSI. To mark the end of the programme we held a research symposium where students show-cased their research and experience. It was a huge success, with Kieran White, University of Liverpool winning the overall prize for the best presentation on ‘Nanotherapeutics for Glioblastoma’ (supervisor Professor Annett Byrne). Kieran has already accepted a PhD position with Prof Byrne on her GlioTrain programme. Thanks to Prof Darran O’Connor and Prof Tracy Robson (MCT) for leading this initiative.

We will also be running the StAR summer internship next year – stay tuned. Here is the link to last year’s programme which will be updated within the next month: http://www.rcsi.ie/starugprogramme

 

Research Summer School Programme 2018

A fantastic few weeks of research is now completed, culminating in the Wrap Up Symposium on Friday, July 27th, 2018. This year not only had we our own students from RCSI but we also welcomed undergraduate students from Hoshi University, Tokyo, Japan; Soochow University, Suzhou, China; the RCSI StAR Summer Internship Programme; FutureNeuro and the Faculty of Dentistry. There was great stuff being done on a number of fronts, not only in the labs but also out on our clinical sites as well as an increase in the number of students involved in some fab systematic reviews. It was incredible to see the breadth of research done by our undergraduate students in such a short period of time. It is a credit to them, their research supervisors and teams. We eagerly look forward to next year’s programme.

Some insights from student’s perspective:

“It was educational in a different way; I expected to learn more about the disease I am working with get an outcome but instead, I feel like I am better equipped to analyse papers and data and methods that are very useful in the future as a clinician.”

“Amazing! Big thanks to Gill and Sarah O’Neill”

“It was a knowledgeable and valuable learning experience that was never dull in any way.”

Reported by Sarah O’Neill