Ancestral origins of increased breast cancer risk and mortality: blame the parents

MCT Research Seminars – 19th December 2018

Leena A. Hilakivi-Clarke, Ph.D. is a professor of Oncology at Georgetown University. She received PhD in 1987 from University of Helsinki, Finland, where she studied the role of maternal exposures during pregnancy in affecting offspring’s later brain development and behaviour. Next, she was a Fogarty postdoctoral fellow (1987-1990) at the National Institute of Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism in Bethesda, Maryland. In 1991, she joined the Lombardi Comprehensive Cancer Center at Georgetown University, Washington DC. Since then, Dr. Hilakivi-Clarke has been investigating how maternal dietary exposures or exposures to the endocrine-disrupting chemical during pregnancy affect daughter’s breast cancer risk, response to endocrine therapy and risk of recurrence. She discovered that the effects of maternal exposures are not limited to F1 generation but extend to at least F3 generation (great granddaughters). In addition, she has studied the effect of these exposures on mother’s breast cancer risk as well as the impact of childhood exposures on breast cancer risk and recurrence. Exposures include ethinyl estradiol, plant-derived phytochemicals, dietary fats and obesity. Her current goals include being able to identify breast cancer patients who have been ancestrally exposed to factors that may impair their response to endocrine therapy and/or increase their risk of recurrence using their pretreatment tumours. She is also exploring combination therapies, including HDAC/DNMT inhibitors and immune therapies that would prevent recurrence in daughters ancestrally exposed to factors that impair their response to antiestrogens. Her publication record consists of over 160 journal articles. She is a recipient of multiple grant awards through her research career, including being a program director for NCI funded U54 program project entitled “Timing of dietary exposures and breast cancer risk” to investigate nutritional modulation of genetic pathways leading to breast cancer.

Time: 1.00pm – 2.00pm

Venue: Bouchier-Hayes Auditorium, No 26 York St

Lunch will be at 12.30 outside the Auditorium

All Welcome!

Congratulations to Remsha Afzal!

The Molecular & Computational Biology Symposium 2018 was held at the Conway Institute of Biomolecular and Biomedical Research in University College Dublin (UCD). This symposium is jointly organised annually by UCD PhD students from the Systems Biology and Infection Biology programs.

This event showcased the thriving local research and scientific community that is present at UCD and in Dublin to Irish and international academic researchers as well as industrial companies. It also featured internationally renowned keynote speakers from a wide range of fields within the sphere of computational and molecular biology to present their research.

Remsha Afzal from Dr. Claire McCoy’s lab was selected to be a speaker at this year’s symposium where she won a prize for best presentation for her topic “The role of IL-10 and arginase in immunometabolism”

See more about the symposium at: http://compmolbiosymp.ucd.ie/

PhD student elevator pitch session

Chairs: Thomas Frawley and Orla Fox

Venue: Houston Lecture Theatre

Date: December, 3d 2018

Time: 12.00

Presenters: 

Rebecca Watkin

George Timmons

Aisling Rehill

Hannah Rushe

Remsha Afzal

Conor Duffy

Martin Kenny

Frances Nally

Sean Patmore

James O’Siorain

Shannon Cox

Lauren Fagan

A light lunch will be served after the talks. Sponsored by Biosciences Ltd.

All Welcome!