MCT Success at RCSI Research Day 2018

Dear All,
I wanted to congratulate everyone for their significant contributions to recent RCSI Research Day.  MCT’s presence was strong on the day with a number of keys oral and poster presentations from across the four MCT research pillars. 
In particular, a huge congratulations to:
 Dr Joan Ni Gabhann for the Most Highly Cited RCSI Senior Authored Paper with Industry Collaboration 2012-2016 for her paper ‘Btk regulates macrophage polarization in response to lipopolysaccharide’.
 Rebecca Watkin (PI Prof Steven Kerrigan) and Edmund Gilbert (PI Prof Gianpiero Cavalleri)  who jointly won the best postgraduate oral presentation, sponsored by Bio-Sciences Limited, for their presentations on ‘S.aureus induced miR330-3p expression triggers abnormal permeability in an ex-vivo 2D model of sepsis’ and ‘The Irish DNA Atlas: Revealing Fine-Scale Population Structure and History within Ireland’, respectively.
 Prof James O’Donnell (ICVB) who won the Clinician CEO Innovation Award.
 Dr Ingmar Schoen for his novel Invention Disclosure.
 Camille Hurley (PI Dr Darran O’Connor) Edmund Gilbert (PI Prof Gianpiero Cavalleri)  and Conor Duffy (PI Claire McCoy) for winning inaugural RCSI International Secondment Awards.
 Finally, well done to Dr Claire McCoy for giving an inspiring and heartfelt presentation about her SFI President of Ireland Future Research Leader Award.
 Well done all. A fantastic achievement for MCT.
 Best wishes,

President Higgins Presents SFI Future Research Leaders Award to Dr Claire McCoy

On 25th January 2018 – President of Ireland, Michael D. Higgins, honoured Dr Claire McCoy with the SFI President of Ireland Future Research Leaders Award at a special ceremony in Áras an Uachtaráin in Dublin. Claire was among one of five recipients for this prestigious award and receives a total of €1.5m, which will support a team of 4 researchers; Dr Jennifer Dowling (Senior Post-Doctoral Researcher and hon. Lecturer), Dr Elizabeth John (Research Assistant), Ms Remsha Afzal (PhD student) and Mr Conor Duffy (PhD student).

Congratulating the awardees at the event in Áras an Uachtaráin President Michael D. Higgins said, “I am delighted to receive the wonderful scientists who have been granted SFI Future Research Leaders Awards. This award celebrates their scientific achievements and significant dedication. Their work is evidence of the ongoing world-class research being carried out in Ireland, positioning us as a global leader for scientific excellence.”

Congratulating the awardees, Prof Mark Ferguson, Director General of Science Foundation Ireland and Chief Scientific Adviser to the Government of Ireland, said “The President of Ireland Future Research Leaders Award is designed to attract to Ireland outstanding new and emerging research talent. In supporting these talented and innovative individuals, we are delighted to recognise early career researchers who have already displayed exceptional leadership potential at the frontiers of knowledge. The development of leadership skills in these researchers early in their careers is vital to ensure research and innovation in Ireland continues to progress. Our investment highlights the importance that Science Foundation Ireland places on supporting all stages of academic careers, and on the attraction and retention of star researchers.”

The research of Dr Claire McCoy is based in the Molecular and Cellular Therapeutics Department at the Royal College of Surgeons Ireland. Her research is focused on significantly advancing current therapeutic strategies for the treatment of multiple sclerosis (MS), where Ireland has the highest global incidence. Speaking of her award, she said “Obtaining this SFI Future Research Leaders award is the highlight of my career to-date. Not only does it enable me to lead a growing research team, it will also significantly contribute to the cutting-edge research being conducted at RCSI. Most importantly, it helps to place Ireland at the forefront of multiple sclerosis research worldwide.”

Pictured (l-r): Professor Mark Ferguson, Director General of Science Foundation Ireland and Chief Scientific Adviser to the Government of Ireland; President Michael D. Higgins; Dr Claire McCoy (MCT dept, RCSI), Dr Francis O’Keeffe (Claire’s Husband)

Reported by SFI communications and Dr Claire McCoy

Kellie McMahon Wins the Lab Safari Competition

Kellie McMahon

I have had an immense passion for science since I began my secondary school journey, which would be five years ago, now! I became engrossed in the subject, and intrigued in all there was to learn from it. I knew it was what I wanted to pursue as a career and that it would be a major part of my future. I couldn’t be more eager to continue on my path of science and see what it has to bring.
So, as you can imagine, when I received word of a lab safari experience in RCSI, I was ecstatic and jumped at the chance to improve my knowledge in the field of molecular and cellular therapeutics, meet new people, both those with a similar ardent spirit of science and interest in the field like myself and those who have incredible stories to share of their journeys in the field. I was also especially keen to get a glimpse of the college itself, as it is a college that really stood out to me, as a lover of science and I have followed its successes and path for years now.
Arriving outside RCSI with my mother, I was filled with joy and overwhelming adrenaline as I was about to enter the college. Upon our entrance, we were shown to a room where we received our introduction talks. We first met Tracy Robson who spoke of her role as head of the department of molecular and cellular therapeutics in RCSI and her inspirational path into the area of science and focuses on the research of cancer. Her talk had to be my most enjoyable part of the whole experience as she expressed that passion for the field is what got her to where she is today, and also going out and discovering opportunities and having the courage to ask questions. It gave me motivation and encouraged me to take all opportunities that may come my way, which will benefit me as I begin my adventure into the scientific world!
We were then introduced to Avril Hutch, head of equality and diversity at RCSI. We did an exercise in which we were shown pictures of workers in the science field and we had to guess which profession they held. It gave us a glimpse at the topic of unconscious bias, particularly in science, and as a female in science myself I greatly respected her and her focus on equality in RCSI.
After being divided into our groups, we put our goggles and lab coats on and began our safari. We firstly arrived at the station of Claire McCoy who informed us of her work, targeting miR-155 activity in macrophages to promote an anti-inflammatory function for multiple sclerosis. The work she does is fascinating and it captured my attention as she explained. She was extremely polite and helpful and all questions I had, she was more than delighted to answer.
Then, moving on we met a team who thought us all about genetics, we even got to do experiments to determine what genetic traits we had ourselves and compare within our group, which I tremendously enjoyed. Lastly, we greeted Olga and John who explained the research in biomarkers for neuroblastoma. It was an extremely gripping topic to learn about and after that sadly, it was time to leave the labs.
Following the tour of the labs, fun experiments completed and brains full of new, amazing knowledge we all received certificates and colouring books of the brain, which I absolutely loved!
Overall the experience was so special to me and every bit of it was wonderful. I feel like I’ve learned so much and can use my new-found knowledge along with my journey in science. I would like to thank RCSI for holding such an event because it is greatly appreciated by those who want to adventure it to the scientific field and those who are unsure, and I hope there will be many more like it in the future. After this whole experience, I am even more certain and passionate about working in the world of science!

Written by Kellie McMahon

Timely Announcement for Nobel Prize


Last Monday while in Amsterdam with my Mam and two sisters, a friend of mine sent a text to let me know that the 2017 Nobel Laureates in Physiology and Medicine were Hall, Rosbash and Young.  They were awarded the Nobel for their work in identifying the key genes that create circadian or body clock rhythms in the fruit fly. My feet literally were stuck to the ground, it was thrilling to know that these gentlemen would get the recognition that they so deserve, but also what this will mean for the field of science that I am so passionate about. The body clock is the molecular timekeeping system that exists in practically every organism on the earth and in every cell in our body. Simply put, it allows the cell to tell what time of day it is. Why is that important? We live on a spinning planet and because of the earth’s rotation to the sun, all life on earth has been subjected to daily periods of light and heat, dark and cold. The body clock allows us to anticipate and respond to these 24-hour predictable environmental changes and synchronises our physiology to it. For example, the body clock increases cortisol levels in the body ahead of awakening, this helps us to become active once we wake. The body clock also increases expression of digestive enzymes in the intestinal tract during daylight hours (this is why curry chips at 3am is never a great idea!).

Back in the 80’s Hall, Rosbash and Young independently isolated a gene called Period, they showed how the gene encodes a protein PER that builds up in cells at night and degrades during the day. This daily rise and fall of PER essentially allow the cell to track time of day. How thrilling it must have been for them to observe this daily change in the mRNA levels of Period gene (Figure 1- black line), all that is changing along the x-axis is the time of day.

So what does this mean three decades later? We have made great strides in understanding how the molecular clock works. We now know that the clock keeps time by a series of transcriptional-translational feedback loops. We also know that the clock controls 40% of all coding genes within the body. The body clock controls all aspects of our physiology from metabolism to immunity.

Many diseases, such as osteoarthritis and cardiovascular disease, are highly time of day dependent. Moreover, it appears that disruption of our body clocks, caused by our non-stop 24/7 lifestyle and exposure to artificial light at all times of day, is partly responsible for the increase in chronic inflammatory diseases. Unfortunately, most cell culture systems are not synchronized with the time of day, and this, in my opinion, is one of the main reasons that many researchers unknowingly neglect this field. Finally, we are making great strides in attempting to time specific treatments to the right time of day, an area called chronotherapy. Therefore, it is my hope that this increased awareness of the body clock will bring more researchers into this fascinating field. If we don’t fully understand how our body clock controls physiology and disease we will certainly be left in the dark.

Annie Curtis is a Research Lecturer and runs the Immune Clock laboratory at MCT and is fascinated by all things body clock related.



Dear all,

Please join me in sending congratulations to the following staff: Sudipto Das and Jennifer Dowling on their appointment as Honorary Lecturer[s] within MCT, recently approved by Academic Council.

Sudipto Das on the award of best poster presentation in the Post-doctoral researcher category for poster titled “Using next-genera-on sequencing strategies to guide precision oncology in cases with atypical clinical presentation” at the Irish Society for Human Genetics Annual Conference held at Croke Park, Dublin on 15th Sep, 2017.

Jamie Early, student with Annie Curtis, for the best short talk at the Irish Society for Immunology Annual meeting. The title of talk: The circadian clock protein BMAL1 regulates inflammation in macrophages via the NRF2 antioxidant defense pathway”.

And finally to ‘Dr’ Rana Bakhidar PhD, who successfully defended her thesis last week. The title of her thesis is ‘Nanoparticles Used in Drug Delivery and Targeting: Understanding the relationships between Nanoparticle Quality And Interaction With Platelets’. Supervisor: Dr. Sarah O’Neill and Co-supervisor, Dr Zeibun Ramtoola, School of Pharmacy,

Well done to all!
Best wishes,


Tracy Robson
Professor & Head of Molecular & Cellular Therapeutics (MCT)

Irish Centre for Vascular Biology Achievements

Bayer announced awards of $2 Million in Hemophilia Research and Patient-care Grants to 16 People at The International Society on Thrombosis and Haemostasis 2017, held in Berlin in July.

Congratulations to Dr. Roger Preston, Irish Centre for Vascular Biology[ICVB], (MCT) who was awarded a prestigious Special Project Award (€200,000) from the Bayer Haemophilia Award Programme to develop novel pro-hemostatic agents for the enhanced treatment of patients with haemophilia.

There was a strong representation from MCT at the ISTH Congress including Professor Dermot Kenny, Professor James O’Donnell, Dr. Roger Preston and their respective teams, and Dr. Dermot Cox, President, SSC* 2018. [*SSC:The Scientific and Standardization Committee].

Orla Willis Fox, Phd student with Dr. Roger Preston (ICVB/MCT), was awarded an ISTH Young Investigator Award for submitting one of the highest ranked abstracts. Her abstract title was ‘Inhibition of Activated Protein C Aspartyl Beta-hydroxylation Restricts Anticoagulant Function but Enhances Cytoprotective Signaling Activity’.

Professor James O’Donnell, ICVB/MCT presented an invited state-of-the-art lecture on his landmark studies on VWF and Cerebral Malaria,Dr. Michelle Lavin, ICVB/MCT on LOVIC [The Low Von Willebrand factor Ireland Cohort (LoVIC)] study, Dr. Sonia Agulia, ICVB/MCT on The Role of Sialylation in low VWF levels andSoracha Ward, ICVB/MCT gave a presentation on VWF Clearance.

Professor James O’Donnell at the International Society on Thrombosis and Haemostasis Congress, Berlin

Additionally, there was significant interest among the attendees in the ISTH SSC 2018 Annual Meeting which will be held in Dublin 2018;  Dr. Dermot Cox, President, SSC 2018 anticipates a record attendance of 3,000 delegates for the Dublin meeting. Olwen Foley , (MCT) managed the Irish stand.


Dr Annie Curtis wins L’Oréal-UNESCO Fellowship For Women in Science

Our congratulations to Dr Annie Curtis with L’Oréal-UNESCO Fellowship For Women in Science Award! Well done!

She was awarded a prestigious L’Oréal-UNESCO For Women in Science 2017 Fellowship at a ceremony held at the Royal Society in London on May 5th.

She was one of five winners of these fellowships and the only Irish winner this year. The fellowship will support her research into understanding the precise mechanisms by which the body clock restrains inflammation from a key immune cell called the macrophage.

Professor Tracy Robson said: “This is a fantastic achievement and I am proud to congratulate Dr Annie Curtis on this highly competitive award for which there were nearly 300 applicants. It is a great testament to her research within the recently established Immuno-Clock Lab. Annie will be an excellent ambassador for Women in Science and this award reflects the world-class research ongoing at RCSI. Indeed the only Irish winners of these For Women in Science fellowships now reside within this institution.”

Recipients of L’Oréal-UNESCO For Women in Science 2017 Fellowship. Courtesy of RCSI Communications Department

The recipients of L’Oréal-UNESCO For Women in Science 2017 Fellowship:

  • Dr Annie Curtis, Royal College of Surgeons in Ireland, the human body clock and inflammation
  • Dr Radha Boya, University of Manchester, Nanoscience
  • Dr Manju Kurian, UCL Great Ormond Street, Neurology
  • Dr Bethan Psaila, University of Oxford, Haematology
  • Dr Priya Subramanian, University of Leeds, Mathematics

RCSI Communications Department


Japan Society for Promotion of Science – Short-term post-doctoral fellowship

Following a workshop conducted at Hoshi University, Tokyo, Japan organized through the ISCA-Japan initiative funded by SFI in October, 2015 a successful collaborative initiative was established between Dr. Sudipto Das (MCT, RCSI) and Prof. Hiroko Ikeda (Department of Neurophysiology, Hoshi University) to investigate the role of epigenetic modifications like DNA methylation in driving a neuronal dysfunction phenotype associated with Diabetes mellitus (DM). Moving this collaboration forward with support from his collaborators at Hoshi University Dr. Sudipto Das has recently received a prestigious short-term post-doctoral fellowship to further his work at Hoshi University from the Japan Society for Promotion of Science (JSPS), which would essentially cover travel, subsistence and a research consumable allowance of 562,000 Japanese Yen. As a part of this fellowship, Dr. Das will travel to Japan for a period of 1.5 months in January 2018. The successful completion of the proposed project as a part of this proposal will for the first time allow the scientific community to understand as to how epigenetic modifications like DNA methylation impact on neurological dysfunction in endocrine

The successful completion of the proposed project as a part of this proposal will for the first time allow the scientific community to understand as to how epigenetic modifications like DNA methylation impact on neurological dysfunction in endocrine related disorders such as DM, thus opening up avenues to utilize this modification to potentially predict such conditions in DM patients.

Sudipto Das

MCT Awards at Research Day 2017

Dear all,

MCT was well represented in the award ceremony at the recent Research Day; our congratulations go to the following:

Dr Mark McCormack, for receiving prizes in the RCSI Author Citations Prizes in two categories – the 2011 Most Highly Cited RCSI Senior Authored Paper and the 2011-2015 Most Highly Cited RCSI Senior Authored Paper with International Collaboration – for his paper entitled “HLA-A*3101 and carbamazepine-induced hypersensitivity reactions in Europeans” published in the New England Journal of Medicine.

Dr Cathy Wyse, as part of Dr Annie Curtis’s group, was presented a prize for the front cover illustration of the RCSI Research Day abstract book, for a striking image of glial cells at the junction between the brain and pituitary gland.

Tony McHale, PhD student at the School of Pharmacy, & MCT, and the Irish Centre for Vascular Biology, RCSI received the prize for the best postgraduate oral presentation, for his talk on the topic of “First in Class Potential Novel Drug for the Treatment of Sepsis Caused by Urinary Tract Infections”.

Medical student Jack Donohue [RSS student], was awarded the Dr Harry O’Flanagan Prize for Excellence in Undergraduate Research for the best undergraduate oral presentation for a project carried out as part of the RCSI Research Summer School entitled “Sanger Confirmation of Suspected Epilepsy-Related Pathogenic Variants Identified Through Next-Generation Sequencing”.

Very well done to all!

Tracy Robson