Multiple Sclerosis Research Network – 30th May 2018

In honour of World MS Day on the 30 May 2018; the Molecular and Cellular Department in the Royal College of Surgeons Ireland along with Trinity College Dublin, MS Society Ireland and Novartis have joined together to create an MS Research Network event.

The event will comprise of three parts; the first is a World MS Day Fundraiser located in the main foyer of RCSI between 8.30 – 10 am, please come and support the #bringinguscloser campaign. The second is a Researcher Forum for scientists working on MS in Ireland, with the aim to establish an official researcher network to enhance collaboration, visibility, and congeniality. The third is a Public Event to launch the most recent MS Society report and inform the public of the importance and relevance of MS research that is conducted in Ireland.

All are welcome to these events (see below details). To register for the day event, email Harriet Doig at harrietd@ms-society.ie, to register for the evening event, email Emma Kinnane at emma.kinnane@novartis.com.

Written and organised by Claire McCoy

World MS Day Fundraiser – Royal College of Surgeons, Main Foyer. 8.30 – 10am

Researcher Forum – Royal College of Surgeons in Ireland, Tutorial Room 2/3
12.00 Meet and Greet (lunch is provided)
12.30 Harriet Doig (MS Society Ireland). ‘The value of a research network in Ireland’
12.40 Claire McCoy (RCSI). ‘The importance of microRNA-155 in Multiple Sclerosis and my contribution to an MS research network’
13.10 Eric Downer (Trinity College Dublin). ‘Exploring Exercise & Cannabinoids as Therapeutic Targets in MS’
13.40 Una Fitzgerald (NUIG). ‘My research and how I can contribute to an MS research network’

14.15 Tea Break

14.45 Jill Moffat (Queen’s University Belfast). ‘The Northern Ireland MS network – challenges and opportunities’
15.00 Denise Fitzgerald (Queen’s University Belfast) ‘My Research and how the Northern Ireland MS network benefits it’
15.30 Mary Fitzsimons (Beaumont Hospital). ‘How to build an MS electronic patient record, lessons from the epilepsy lighthouse project’
15.45 Alexis Donnelly (Patient advocate). ‘How patients can help build MS research’

Public Event – Trinity Biomedical Sciences Institute, Trinity College Dublin
18.00 MS Society Report Launch
18.20 Clinician – Orla Hardiman (Beaumont Hospital and Trinity College Dublin)
18.40 Researcher – Claire McCoy (RCSI)
19.00 Patient Advocate – Joan Jordan (Patient Advocate)

Daffodil Day Spinathon

On Friday, March 23rd, MCT and the Department of Physiology hosted a Spinathon for Daffodil Day, the Irish Cancer Society’s biggest fundraising day of the year. The aim of the Spinathon was to cycle the same distance as the Ring of Kerry, a total of 170 km on each bike. A number of willing participants took part on the day, including Sudipto, Lisa, George and Tony from MCT. A total of €1966 between the JustGiving.ie fundraising page and bucket collections on the day.

Final Year Royal College of Surgeons PhD Student Lisa Dwane from Clondalkin who is conducting research into hormone driven breast cancer with some daffodils for Daffodil Day and her colleagues (from left) Post Doctoral Researchers Dr Gillian Moore from Baldoyle and Dr. Brian Mooney from Bray Co. Wicklow and Dr. Stephanie Annett from Lisburn Co Antrim.
Pic Steve Humphreys
22nd March 2018

Well done to everyone involved!

World Haemophilia Day 2018

Haemophilia is a genetic blood disorder that affects one in 5,500 people in Ireland. This disorder impairs body’s ability to make blood clots and stop bleeding.

Last Tuesday the 17th of April was World Haemophilia Day 2018, the Irish Haemophilia Society (IHS) celebrated both World Haemophilia day and there 50th anniversary with multiple events around the country.

The day began with myself (in the middle of the pic) and Brian O’Mahony (the CEO of the IHS) appearing on Ireland AM to speak about the development of Haemophilia care in Ireland over the last 50 years.

The celebrations continued with the revealing of a street art project reflecting the personal experience of patients and nurses from St James’s Hospital. The visual, commissioned by the Irish Haemophilia Society in partnership with Roche, was developed by artist Shane O’Malley and unveiled on Machen street and in St. James’s Hospital to coincide with World Haemophilia Week.

Brian O’Mahony and Dr. Michelle Lavin spoke at the Shire office about personalised treatment as well as the challenges that still need to be addressed to further our understanding of Haemophilia.

The Day concluded with the “light it up red” light show, a long list of landmarks including RCSI, Edinburgh castle and the convention Centre were among landmarks worldwide which were lit up red for the night.

Reported by Seamus McDonald

https://www.facebook.com/irishhaemophiliasociety/

 

Kellie McMahon Wins the Lab Safari Competition

Kellie McMahon

I have had an immense passion for science since I began my secondary school journey, which would be five years ago, now! I became engrossed in the subject, and intrigued in all there was to learn from it. I knew it was what I wanted to pursue as a career and that it would be a major part of my future. I couldn’t be more eager to continue on my path of science and see what it has to bring.
So, as you can imagine, when I received word of a lab safari experience in RCSI, I was ecstatic and jumped at the chance to improve my knowledge in the field of molecular and cellular therapeutics, meet new people, both those with a similar ardent spirit of science and interest in the field like myself and those who have incredible stories to share of their journeys in the field. I was also especially keen to get a glimpse of the college itself, as it is a college that really stood out to me, as a lover of science and I have followed its successes and path for years now.
Arriving outside RCSI with my mother, I was filled with joy and overwhelming adrenaline as I was about to enter the college. Upon our entrance, we were shown to a room where we received our introduction talks. We first met Tracy Robson who spoke of her role as head of the department of molecular and cellular therapeutics in RCSI and her inspirational path into the area of science and focuses on the research of cancer. Her talk had to be my most enjoyable part of the whole experience as she expressed that passion for the field is what got her to where she is today, and also going out and discovering opportunities and having the courage to ask questions. It gave me motivation and encouraged me to take all opportunities that may come my way, which will benefit me as I begin my adventure into the scientific world!
We were then introduced to Avril Hutch, head of equality and diversity at RCSI. We did an exercise in which we were shown pictures of workers in the science field and we had to guess which profession they held. It gave us a glimpse at the topic of unconscious bias, particularly in science, and as a female in science myself I greatly respected her and her focus on equality in RCSI.
After being divided into our groups, we put our goggles and lab coats on and began our safari. We firstly arrived at the station of Claire McCoy who informed us of her work, targeting miR-155 activity in macrophages to promote an anti-inflammatory function for multiple sclerosis. The work she does is fascinating and it captured my attention as she explained. She was extremely polite and helpful and all questions I had, she was more than delighted to answer.
Then, moving on we met a team who thought us all about genetics, we even got to do experiments to determine what genetic traits we had ourselves and compare within our group, which I tremendously enjoyed. Lastly, we greeted Olga and John who explained the research in biomarkers for neuroblastoma. It was an extremely gripping topic to learn about and after that sadly, it was time to leave the labs.
Following the tour of the labs, fun experiments completed and brains full of new, amazing knowledge we all received certificates and colouring books of the brain, which I absolutely loved!
Overall the experience was so special to me and every bit of it was wonderful. I feel like I’ve learned so much and can use my new-found knowledge along with my journey in science. I would like to thank RCSI for holding such an event because it is greatly appreciated by those who want to adventure it to the scientific field and those who are unsure, and I hope there will be many more like it in the future. After this whole experience, I am even more certain and passionate about working in the world of science!

Written by Kellie McMahon

MCT Lab Safari Activities

On November 14th, we welcomed almost 50 secondary school students at our Department for Lab Safari. The event was designed to encourage young people to consider a career in Science, Technology, Engineering, Maths and Medicine through hands-on experience and demonstrations prepared by our researchers. We developed 6 different workstations focused on Cancer biology and biomarkers, Drug Discovery, Multiple Sclerosis, Human Genetics and Immunology/Body clock

Tracy Robson

The event was opened by Prof. Tracy Robson, Head of MCT, sharing her career path in research and lessons that she learnt. Dr Avril Hutch, Head of RSCI Equality and Diversity Unit, also spoke about stereotypes in STEMM careers and having an awareness of unconscious bias.

Caragh Stapleton

Human Genetics
Our workstation was led by Caragh Stapleton, Katherine Benson and Edmund Gilbert, centered around human genetics. Our activity set out to teach participants about inherited traits and demonstrate how variation in our DNA influences our physical attributes. We investigated a number of traits including PTC taster (using PTC taste strips), colour blindness, widows peak, tongue rolling, attached earlobes, bent little finger, eye colour and red hair. Each participant noted whether or not they had the given trait and we then discussed the hypotheses of the genetic variants influencing the different traits.

Olga Piskareva and John Nolan

Cancer Biomarkers
Our workstation was led by Olga Piskareva and John Nolan. We explained the concept of biomarkers and the importance of discovering novel biomarkers for neuroblastoma, a childhood malignancy. Various chromosomal aberrations can be biomarkers of neuroblastoma aggressiveness. One of the strongest predictors of rapid neuroblastoma progression is MYCN status. We selected several neuroblastoma cell lines with known MYCN status providing a good illustration of biomarker’s quantity. Using immunodetection, we visualised the differences in the MYCN presence.

Mariana Patricia Cervantes Silva

Immunology/Body Clock
Our workstation was led by Annie Curtis, Mariana Patricia Cervantes Silva, George Timmons and Cathy Wyse. The theme of our activity was on the body clock and immune function. We discussed with the students why they get jet lag and what that has to do with their body clock. Students then moved to the first station where they got a chance to add colouring to macrophages, so we had red, yellow, blue and green macrophages and were able to look at their coloured macrophages under a microscope. Then they moved to the next station where they got to see the master clock which resides in the hypothalamus of the brain under a microscope. Finally, we displayed some images of activated macrophages and explained their function.

Stephanie Annett

Cancer Cell Biology
Our workstation lead by Sudipto Das, Gillian Moore and Stephanie Annett, focused on showcasing the various laboratory-based approaches applied regularly to identify and investigate novel gene or protein-based biomarkers of cancer progression. Within our workstation, we highlighted three key areas including how samples following biopsy from a cancer patient are used to construct tissue microarrays which are used for assessing the importance of a certain protein in cancer. This was followed by demonstrating a particular tissue culture-based method used to study anti-cancer properties of drugs and finally displaying an array of microscopic images of blood vessels developing in a given tumour.

Conor Duffy

Multiple Sclerosis
Our workstation was led by Claire McCoy, Remsha Afzal and Conor Duffy. The research focus at our lab safari station was Multiple Sclerosis (MS). We explained how the causes of MS are unknown, but that it is characterised by an influx of immune cells into the brain and spinal cord. Our research aims to investigate one type of immune cell called the macrophage. We aim to understand the damage macrophages cause in MS and if we can reverse this to provide an alternative tool for MS therapeutics. We really enjoyed explaining our research at the Lab Safari, where we showed students how MS impacts on brain function and showed them examples of activated macrophages under the microscope.

Padraig Norton

Drug Discovery
Our workstation was led by Dermot Cox and Padraig Norton. Students were given a brief history of drug discovery. Then they were introduced to the basic concepts of how a drug binds to its target and the different ways in which a drug can bind. Students were then shown a demonstration of molecular docking on a computer whereby a small molecule, or drug candidate, was virtually docked into a target binding site using the software.

Tracy Robson and Anne Grady

The event was led by Dr Maria Morgan, Anne Grady, Prof. Tracy Robson, Dr Olga Piskareva and John O’Brien. Guides on the evening included Olwen Foley, Camille Hurley, Mary Ledwith, Seamus McDonald and Shane O’Grady.

Are you ready for MCT Lab Safari?

Registration is closed and all places on the MCT Lab Safari have now been filled.
We can’t wait to meet our potential future scientists tomorrow at 5pm! The lab coats are ready and the MCT labs have never looked so clean. We have prepared some great experiments and demonstrations to showcase our ongoing research. Everyone will have an opportunity to explore our labs and perform some hands-on science activities.

MCT Lab Safari Programme:

4.50pm:    Arrival and registration – Front Hall SSG
5pm:          Welcome and brief introductions
5.05pm:   Meet a leading scientist and hear her career journey
5.15pm:    Visit our research laboratories in small groups safari style
6.30pm:   Q&A with refreshments
7pm:          Close

 We are looking forward to seeing you all tomorrow!

TUESDAY, 14th NOVEMBER, 2017 5PM – 6.30PM
RCSI, ST STEPHENS GREEN, DUBLIN 2

Lab Safari

EVER WONDERED WHAT THOSE PEOPLE IN WHITE LAB COATS ACTUALLY DO?

COULD YOU BE ONE?

Join us for an opportunity to see exactly what
happens in a research laboratory. The Department
of Molecular and Cellular Therapeutics (MCT)
at RCSI is opening its doors for a science week
interactive tour. Visitors will get to interact with
high-profile scientists, explore our labs and
perform some hands-on science activities.
Anyone considering a career in science is
welcome but we particularly encourage young
women/girls to attend, to promote the full
participation of girls and women in science.

TUESDAY, 14th NOVEMBER, 2017 5PM – 6.30PM
RCSI, ST STEPHENS GREEN, DUBLIN 2

MCT Lab Safari

Click here to register!

The event is free but pre-registration is required
Queries: Tel: 01 402 2420 Email: agrady@rcsi.ie
*This is a real working research lab so due care must be taken and all instructions must be followed.

 

Imagine playing Marco Polo on the big football pitch?

Do you remember playing Marco Polo and trying to acoustically locate and tag the players? Imagine playing Marco Polo on the big football pitch when each player has their eyes closed and trying to locate a football. You would probably visualise the pitch in your head and try to create a virtual reality.
What if none of the players ever saw the pitch? Football? How could it be possible to play? Is it possible at all? I have never thought of that until recently. But, there are enthusiasts around who make the difference for blind people and let them enjoy football and the game. We are lucky to know one of them! It is our John O’Brien.

John has started the football coaching journey recently. He and Stephen Bolger (of our security team at Bilfinger) have been coaching the Irish National Blind Football team and are enrolled on the FAI (Football Association of Ireland) Coach Education Pathway. Under Stephen and John’s guidance, along with their fellow coaches, Ireland put in some great performances in the tournament and finished in sixth place – a great achievement for their first international tournament.

Adapted from the news by the RCSI Communication Department

Head of the MCT Department, Prof Tracy Robson says “It seems that as well as skilfully managing our MCT laboratories, John clearly has other hidden talents. It’s amazing that John is giving up his free time to coach the Irish National Football Team; a wonderful outreach activity. We are all very proud of you John…..”

You do not need to be millennials to create the world where everyone has a sense of purpose.

Come and ask John how he does it and what is next!

Olga Piskareva

Daffodil Day Bake sale – 24/03/2017

Daffodil day is marked on the annual calendar as one of the most significant days recognised for collecting donations from the Irish public to fund cancer research as well as various services provided by the Irish Cancer Society. Given the substantial amount of cancer researchers based in RCSI and in particular in MCT, a joint effort between the MCT and the Department of Physiology and Medical Physics was carried out to organise a “Bake sale” aimed to raise funds on this occasion. Dr. Sudipto Das (MCT) and Dr. Catriona Dowling (Physiology and Medical Physics) primarily organised the bake sale.

This year bake sale boasted a wide variety of baked goods prepared by various members of the staff including senior researchers and post-graduate students. One the main highlights of the bake sale was an auction for an exquisite chocolate biscuit cake with a daffodil theme baked by Ms. Ina Woods (Physiology and Medical Physics). The auction was successfully completed by selling the cake at the highest bid of 50 euro by Prof. Jochen Prehn. This year bake sale was a highly successful event, which effectively raised 800 euro with all proceeding going towards the Irish Cancer Society.

We thank everyone who made this fundraising event into an enjoyable and fruitful event.

 Reported by Sudipto Das