Prof Luke O’Neill delivered the inaugural lecture at the RCSI Research Seminar Series

Prof Luke O’Neill delivered the inaugural lecture at the RCSI Research Seminar Series yesterday. Luke O’Neill is the professor of Biochemistry and Immunology at Trinity College Dublin. Luke is a world-renowned scientist known for his contributions to the field of Immunology, more specifically Toll-like receptors, innate immune signaling, cytokines and most recently Immunometabolism. He is one of Ireland’s most influential scientists having published >300 publications and is in the top 1% of the world’s most cited scientists in Immunology. He is the recipient of many prestigious awards including the Boyle Medal for Scientific Excellence and last year was elected a Fellow of the Royal Society.

Luke told us many exciting stories. The first highlighted how the inflammasome sensor NLRP3 is critical for the production of the pro-inflammatory cytokine IL-1. A cytokine essential for our fight against infection, but is elevated and extremely damaging in many diseases including Rheumatoid arthritis, colitis, Parkinson’s, Alzheimer’s, diabetes and hypertension. Luke’s team discovered a small molecule inhibitor against NLRP3 that has shown efficacy in 32 models of disease, as astounding effect never observed before. The inhibitor is now entering clinical trials and could excitingly pave the way as a radical treatment for many diseases.

The second story introduced the concept of Immunometabolism, a phenomenon where immune cells utilize metabolic pathways to generate inflammatory mediators. In response to infection, immune cells such as macrophages increase the production of glycolysis whilst at the same time cause a block in Kreb’s cycle. This block leads to the accumulation of intermediates such as succinate. Importantly, Luke has shown that succinate is critical for the production of IL-1 via the transcription factor HIF-1alpha. Inhibition of succinate ablates IL-1 production in response to infection, as well as in a number of disease models tested. Luke highlights that the manipulation of energy pathways could very likely provide an alternative mechanism for therapy in inflammatory disorders.

It was a real pleasure to hear Luke speak at RCSI. To learn more about the above stories, check out the following publications:

Irish Association of Pharmacologists Announcement

Dear IAP Members

I wanted to update you on developments over the past number of weeks.

I can report that we have made progress with an application for the IAP to join the European Association for Clinical Pharmacology & Therapeutics (EACPT -https://www.eacpt.eu/who-we-are-2/), who responded very positively and who have said that they will put our application to their executive committee at their next meeting in April. We look forward in hope to the last blank space in Western Europe being filled in blue very soon (see: https://www.eacpt.eu/members/national-society-affiliated-to-eacpt/).

We have also applied for membership of the Federation of European Pharmacological Societies (EPHAR -http://www.ephar.org/home.html), who have also responded very positively to our initial enquiries.

We are currently working on the IAP website and expect to be able to update you on developments shortly.

In the meantime, we would very much appreciate your promoting the newly constituted IAP to those who you think would be interested in becoming members. We anticipate that the benefits will soon include membership of European federations and the opportunities for contact with European colleagues.

Thomas

Prof. Thomas Walther
President
Irish Association of Pharmacologists