Irish Centre for Vascular Biology Achievements

Bayer announced awards of $2 Million in Hemophilia Research and Patient-care Grants to 16 People at The International Society on Thrombosis and Haemostasis 2017, held in Berlin in July.

Congratulations to Dr. Roger Preston, Irish Centre for Vascular Biology[ICVB], (MCT) who was awarded a prestigious Special Project Award (€200,000) from the Bayer Haemophilia Award Programme to develop novel pro-hemostatic agents for the enhanced treatment of patients with haemophilia.

There was a strong representation from MCT at the ISTH Congress including Professor Dermot Kenny, Professor James O’Donnell, Dr. Roger Preston and their respective teams, and Dr. Dermot Cox, President, SSC* 2018. [*SSC:The Scientific and Standardization Committee].

Orla Willis Fox, Phd student with Dr. Roger Preston (ICVB/MCT), was awarded an ISTH Young Investigator Award for submitting one of the highest ranked abstracts. Her abstract title was ‘Inhibition of Activated Protein C Aspartyl Beta-hydroxylation Restricts Anticoagulant Function but Enhances Cytoprotective Signaling Activity’.

Professor James O’Donnell, ICVB/MCT presented an invited state-of-the-art lecture on his landmark studies on VWF and Cerebral Malaria,Dr. Michelle Lavin, ICVB/MCT on LOVIC [The Low Von Willebrand factor Ireland Cohort (LoVIC)] study, Dr. Sonia Agulia, ICVB/MCT on The Role of Sialylation in low VWF levels andSoracha Ward, ICVB/MCT gave a presentation on VWF Clearance.

Professor James O’Donnell at the International Society on Thrombosis and Haemostasis Congress, Berlin

Additionally, there was significant interest among the attendees in the ISTH SSC 2018 Annual Meeting which will be held in Dublin 2018;  Dr. Dermot Cox, President, SSC 2018 anticipates a record attendance of 3,000 delegates for the Dublin meeting. Olwen Foley , (MCT) managed the Irish stand.

ICVB/MCT

A pharmacogenomic exploration of adverse drug reactions in epilepsy (PGXOME)

For most people with epilepsy, long term treatment with anti-epileptic drugs (AEDs) are necessary to prevent the seizure, and 40% do not respond to the first line of AED, leading to an often lifelong odyssey of trial and error towards effective treatment that is often not found. Epilepsy is primarily treated using AEDs, but these are associated with a considerable risk for adverse drug reactions (ADRs), some of which have been shown to have a genetic predisposition. For example, the genetic variant HLA-A*3101 is a common risk factor for rash and severe blistering skin reactions with the drug carbamazepine (Tegretol) in Europeans. However there are few other predictors of some more common ADRs.

Dr. Mark McCormack

The EpiPGX Consortium was established to identify genetic biomarkers of epilepsy treatment response from patient centres across Europe. The EpiPGX Consortium has generated genetic profiles on over 8000 patients with matching detailed drug response and medical histories. In order to investigate the links between genetic profiles and ADRs in epilepsy, Dr. Mark McCormack will travel to UMC Utrecht, the Netherlands for one year on a  Marie-Skłodowska-Curie Fellowship from the European Commission.

The aim of this fellowship is to identify clinically useful genetic variants to predict adverse reactions to AEDs. This will help optimize personalized treatment, limit the trial and error approach of AED choice, and thus improve medication safety and quality of life in epilepsy.

Dr HH Stewart Award to Aya Al-Hasani

MCT is delighted to report that Aya Al-Hasani, one of our undergraduate Medical Students, has come second place in the Biochemistry Section of National Universities of Ireland, Dr HH Stewart Award. The top three students from RCSI are invited to take part in the exams, for each category.  Students are sent the essay title a week in advance, are not allowed to confer with staff, and sit the essay under exam conditions.

 Aya reflects on her award:

Aya AL-Hasani at Royal Hospital Kilmainham, Wednesday 09 November 2016. http://www.nui.ie/images/news/2016/awards2016_Flash/index.asp
Aya AL-Hasani at Royal Hospital Kilmainham, Wednesday 09 November 2016.
http://www.nui.ie/images/news/2016/awards2016_Flash/index.asp

During my first few years at RCSI, my hardest subject was biochemistry. Those complicated signalling pathways seemed absolutely useless to learn at that time. I then started to realise that biochemistry is essentially the platform for understanding all diseases and treatments. Suddenly, biochemistry became my favourite subject! I was so inspired by Prof. Cavalleri, MCT, who was organised and passionate in his teaching. I chose my favourite topic “obesity” after being invited to sit the HH Stewart exam. I was delighted to know that I won the second prize. It meant a lot for me to compete and win an Irish national competition. I just wished my parents were able to see me in the ceremony.

Aya attended the ceremony at Royal Hospital Kilmainham on Wednesday 09 November 2016.

Well done Aya!