Congratulations to Remsha Afzal!

The Molecular & Computational Biology Symposium 2018 was held at the Conway Institute of Biomolecular and Biomedical Research in University College Dublin (UCD). This symposium is jointly organised annually by UCD PhD students from the Systems Biology and Infection Biology programs.

This event showcased the thriving local research and scientific community that is present at UCD and in Dublin to Irish and international academic researchers as well as industrial companies. It also featured internationally renowned keynote speakers from a wide range of fields within the sphere of computational and molecular biology to present their research.

Remsha Afzal from Dr. Claire McCoy’s lab was selected to be a speaker at this year’s symposium where she won a prize for best presentation for her topic “The role of IL-10 and arginase in immunometabolism”

See more about the symposium at: http://compmolbiosymp.ucd.ie/

MCT Success at RCSI Research Day 2018

Dear All,
I wanted to congratulate everyone for their significant contributions to recent RCSI Research Day.  MCT’s presence was strong on the day with a number of keys oral and poster presentations from across the four MCT research pillars. 
In particular, a huge congratulations to:
 Dr Joan Ni Gabhann for the Most Highly Cited RCSI Senior Authored Paper with Industry Collaboration 2012-2016 for her paper ‘Btk regulates macrophage polarization in response to lipopolysaccharide’.
 Rebecca Watkin (PI Prof Steven Kerrigan) and Edmund Gilbert (PI Prof Gianpiero Cavalleri)  who jointly won the best postgraduate oral presentation, sponsored by Bio-Sciences Limited, for their presentations on ‘S.aureus induced miR330-3p expression triggers abnormal permeability in an ex-vivo 2D model of sepsis’ and ‘The Irish DNA Atlas: Revealing Fine-Scale Population Structure and History within Ireland’, respectively.
 Prof James O’Donnell (ICVB) who won the Clinician CEO Innovation Award.
 Dr Ingmar Schoen for his novel Invention Disclosure.
 Camille Hurley (PI Dr Darran O’Connor) Edmund Gilbert (PI Prof Gianpiero Cavalleri)  and Conor Duffy (PI Claire McCoy) for winning inaugural RCSI International Secondment Awards.
 Finally, well done to Dr Claire McCoy for giving an inspiring and heartfelt presentation about her SFI President of Ireland Future Research Leader Award.
 Well done all. A fantastic achievement for MCT.
 Best wishes,
Tracy

Kellie McMahon Wins the Lab Safari Competition

Kellie McMahon

I have had an immense passion for science since I began my secondary school journey, which would be five years ago, now! I became engrossed in the subject, and intrigued in all there was to learn from it. I knew it was what I wanted to pursue as a career and that it would be a major part of my future. I couldn’t be more eager to continue on my path of science and see what it has to bring.
So, as you can imagine, when I received word of a lab safari experience in RCSI, I was ecstatic and jumped at the chance to improve my knowledge in the field of molecular and cellular therapeutics, meet new people, both those with a similar ardent spirit of science and interest in the field like myself and those who have incredible stories to share of their journeys in the field. I was also especially keen to get a glimpse of the college itself, as it is a college that really stood out to me, as a lover of science and I have followed its successes and path for years now.
Arriving outside RCSI with my mother, I was filled with joy and overwhelming adrenaline as I was about to enter the college. Upon our entrance, we were shown to a room where we received our introduction talks. We first met Tracy Robson who spoke of her role as head of the department of molecular and cellular therapeutics in RCSI and her inspirational path into the area of science and focuses on the research of cancer. Her talk had to be my most enjoyable part of the whole experience as she expressed that passion for the field is what got her to where she is today, and also going out and discovering opportunities and having the courage to ask questions. It gave me motivation and encouraged me to take all opportunities that may come my way, which will benefit me as I begin my adventure into the scientific world!
We were then introduced to Avril Hutch, head of equality and diversity at RCSI. We did an exercise in which we were shown pictures of workers in the science field and we had to guess which profession they held. It gave us a glimpse at the topic of unconscious bias, particularly in science, and as a female in science myself I greatly respected her and her focus on equality in RCSI.
After being divided into our groups, we put our goggles and lab coats on and began our safari. We firstly arrived at the station of Claire McCoy who informed us of her work, targeting miR-155 activity in macrophages to promote an anti-inflammatory function for multiple sclerosis. The work she does is fascinating and it captured my attention as she explained. She was extremely polite and helpful and all questions I had, she was more than delighted to answer.
Then, moving on we met a team who thought us all about genetics, we even got to do experiments to determine what genetic traits we had ourselves and compare within our group, which I tremendously enjoyed. Lastly, we greeted Olga and John who explained the research in biomarkers for neuroblastoma. It was an extremely gripping topic to learn about and after that sadly, it was time to leave the labs.
Following the tour of the labs, fun experiments completed and brains full of new, amazing knowledge we all received certificates and colouring books of the brain, which I absolutely loved!
Overall the experience was so special to me and every bit of it was wonderful. I feel like I’ve learned so much and can use my new-found knowledge along with my journey in science. I would like to thank RCSI for holding such an event because it is greatly appreciated by those who want to adventure it to the scientific field and those who are unsure, and I hope there will be many more like it in the future. After this whole experience, I am even more certain and passionate about working in the world of science!

Written by Kellie McMahon

Irish Centre for Vascular Biology Achievements

Bayer announced awards of $2 Million in Hemophilia Research and Patient-care Grants to 16 People at The International Society on Thrombosis and Haemostasis 2017, held in Berlin in July.

Congratulations to Dr. Roger Preston, Irish Centre for Vascular Biology[ICVB], (MCT) who was awarded a prestigious Special Project Award (€200,000) from the Bayer Haemophilia Award Programme to develop novel pro-hemostatic agents for the enhanced treatment of patients with haemophilia.

There was a strong representation from MCT at the ISTH Congress including Professor Dermot Kenny, Professor James O’Donnell, Dr. Roger Preston and their respective teams, and Dr. Dermot Cox, President, SSC* 2018. [*SSC:The Scientific and Standardization Committee].

Orla Willis Fox, Phd student with Dr. Roger Preston (ICVB/MCT), was awarded an ISTH Young Investigator Award for submitting one of the highest ranked abstracts. Her abstract title was ‘Inhibition of Activated Protein C Aspartyl Beta-hydroxylation Restricts Anticoagulant Function but Enhances Cytoprotective Signaling Activity’.

Professor James O’Donnell, ICVB/MCT presented an invited state-of-the-art lecture on his landmark studies on VWF and Cerebral Malaria,Dr. Michelle Lavin, ICVB/MCT on LOVIC [The Low Von Willebrand factor Ireland Cohort (LoVIC)] study, Dr. Sonia Agulia, ICVB/MCT on The Role of Sialylation in low VWF levels andSoracha Ward, ICVB/MCT gave a presentation on VWF Clearance.

Professor James O’Donnell at the International Society on Thrombosis and Haemostasis Congress, Berlin

Additionally, there was significant interest among the attendees in the ISTH SSC 2018 Annual Meeting which will be held in Dublin 2018;  Dr. Dermot Cox, President, SSC 2018 anticipates a record attendance of 3,000 delegates for the Dublin meeting. Olwen Foley , (MCT) managed the Irish stand.

ICVB/MCT

A pharmacogenomic exploration of adverse drug reactions in epilepsy (PGXOME)

For most people with epilepsy, long term treatment with anti-epileptic drugs (AEDs) are necessary to prevent the seizure, and 40% do not respond to the first line of AED, leading to an often lifelong odyssey of trial and error towards effective treatment that is often not found. Epilepsy is primarily treated using AEDs, but these are associated with a considerable risk for adverse drug reactions (ADRs), some of which have been shown to have a genetic predisposition. For example, the genetic variant HLA-A*3101 is a common risk factor for rash and severe blistering skin reactions with the drug carbamazepine (Tegretol) in Europeans. However there are few other predictors of some more common ADRs.

Dr. Mark McCormack

The EpiPGX Consortium was established to identify genetic biomarkers of epilepsy treatment response from patient centres across Europe. The EpiPGX Consortium has generated genetic profiles on over 8000 patients with matching detailed drug response and medical histories. In order to investigate the links between genetic profiles and ADRs in epilepsy, Dr. Mark McCormack will travel to UMC Utrecht, the Netherlands for one year on a  Marie-Skłodowska-Curie Fellowship from the European Commission.

The aim of this fellowship is to identify clinically useful genetic variants to predict adverse reactions to AEDs. This will help optimize personalized treatment, limit the trial and error approach of AED choice, and thus improve medication safety and quality of life in epilepsy.

Dr HH Stewart Award to Aya Al-Hasani

MCT is delighted to report that Aya Al-Hasani, one of our undergraduate Medical Students, has come second place in the Biochemistry Section of National Universities of Ireland, Dr HH Stewart Award. The top three students from RCSI are invited to take part in the exams, for each category.  Students are sent the essay title a week in advance, are not allowed to confer with staff, and sit the essay under exam conditions.

 Aya reflects on her award:

Aya AL-Hasani at Royal Hospital Kilmainham, Wednesday 09 November 2016. http://www.nui.ie/images/news/2016/awards2016_Flash/index.asp
Aya AL-Hasani at Royal Hospital Kilmainham, Wednesday 09 November 2016.
http://www.nui.ie/images/news/2016/awards2016_Flash/index.asp

During my first few years at RCSI, my hardest subject was biochemistry. Those complicated signalling pathways seemed absolutely useless to learn at that time. I then started to realise that biochemistry is essentially the platform for understanding all diseases and treatments. Suddenly, biochemistry became my favourite subject! I was so inspired by Prof. Cavalleri, MCT, who was organised and passionate in his teaching. I chose my favourite topic “obesity” after being invited to sit the HH Stewart exam. I was delighted to know that I won the second prize. It meant a lot for me to compete and win an Irish national competition. I just wished my parents were able to see me in the ceremony.

Aya attended the ceremony at Royal Hospital Kilmainham on Wednesday 09 November 2016.

Well done Aya!