Dr Annie Curtis wins L’Oréal-UNESCO Fellowship For Women in Science

Our congratulations to Dr Annie Curtis with L’Oréal-UNESCO Fellowship For Women in Science Award! Well done!

She was awarded a prestigious L’Oréal-UNESCO For Women in Science 2017 Fellowship at a ceremony held at the Royal Society in London on May 5th.

She was one of five winners of these fellowships and the only Irish winner this year. The fellowship will support her research into understanding the precise mechanisms by which the body clock restrains inflammation from a key immune cell called the macrophage.

Professor Tracy Robson said: “This is a fantastic achievement and I am proud to congratulate Dr Annie Curtis on this highly competitive award for which there were nearly 300 applicants. It is a great testament to her research within the recently established Immuno-Clock Lab. Annie will be an excellent ambassador for Women in Science and this award reflects the world-class research ongoing at RCSI. Indeed the only Irish winners of these For Women in Science fellowships now reside within this institution.”

Recipients of L’Oréal-UNESCO For Women in Science 2017 Fellowship. Courtesy of RCSI Communications Department

The recipients of L’Oréal-UNESCO For Women in Science 2017 Fellowship:

  • Dr Annie Curtis, Royal College of Surgeons in Ireland, the human body clock and inflammation
  • Dr Radha Boya, University of Manchester, Nanoscience
  • Dr Manju Kurian, UCL Great Ormond Street, Neurology
  • Dr Bethan Psaila, University of Oxford, Haematology
  • Dr Priya Subramanian, University of Leeds, Mathematics

RCSI Communications Department

 

The Immune-Clock laboratory of Dr. Annie Curtis, a recent recruit to RCSI

MCT Research Talks – 30th January 2017

Last week’s departmental talks encompassed a Deep Dive into Clock biology in Macrophages affecting the Inflammatory Response. This area is the focus of the Immune-Clock laboratory of Dr. Annie Curtis, a recent recruit to RCSI.

Jamie Early, my PhD student

Jamie Early (PhD student of the Curtis Lab) currently residing in the Luke O’Neill Laboratory presented his findings on the role of the circadian clock in suppressing inflammation in macrophages and if the anti-oxidant transcription factor and redox sensor NRF2 plays a role. His talk was titled ‘The macrophage clock is a key controller of the anti-oxidant and inflammatory response via the transcription factor Nrf2’.

Second up, we had Mariana Cervantes (PhD student and visiting scientist from the Instituto Politecnico Nacional (IPN) in Mexico) present her talk titled ‘The macrophage clock is having a profound impact on mitochondrial dynamics- what are the implications for inflammation?’

Mariana Cervantes

Mariana is interested in how mitochondria alter their morphology, either fusing together to form networks or fragmenting into smaller units termed fission. She is trying to uncover if the clock is regulating this process and if so what are the implications for the inflammatory response.

This work is part of a collaboration between RCSI and  Luke O’Neill laboratory at TCD and is funded through Science Foundation Ireland

Immunometabolism, Is it under the eye of the clock

Annie Curtis reports

Our Immune-clock laboratory has a real interest in metabolism and how alterations in metabolic pathways termed “metabolic reprogramming” can shape the type of immune response. This area called “Immunometabolism” has exploded in the last 5 years, and the implications are massive. It appears that macrophages use one metabolic pathway to become highly proinflammatory and another metabolic pathway to resolve inflammation and promote wound healing.  So why is our laboratory so interested in this? Well, if you think about daily changes in our environment, the two biggest are the sleep/wake cycle and the other is feeding/fasting. It is now clear that clocks in metabolic tissues like the liver/pancreas/adipose tissue prepare the body to deal with this daily rhythm in feeding/fasting. Based on this, our interest is to figure out if the clock within macrophages is somehow altering its metabolism over the course of the day and is that leading to changes in macrophage function, particularly the inflammatory response.

Jamie Early, my PhD student

Jamie Early, my PhD who “lives” in Prof. Luke O’Neills laboratory at TCD and I were invited to submit this first ever review on circadian immunometabolism, and you can find it here.

Additional reading

  1. Early JO, Curtis AM Immunometabolism: Is it under the eye of the clock?Semin Immunol. 2016 Oct;28(5):478-490

Follow me on Twitter @curtisannie

Its about Time! The role of body clocks in health and disease

Annie Curtis reports

How metabolic and immune parameters vary across the 24 hours (1).

Body clocks tend to garner quite a bit of attention from the media. Folks are obsessed with sleep, either they cant get enough or they are getting too much, and all of us can relate to the symptoms of jet lag and morning versus evening types. Therefore it’s a great topic to discuss with wider audiences. I really enjoy chatting with people about the implications of our internal timing system and that research now shows that living in synchrony with your body clock can improve overall health. For the SFI Science week I was asked to provide an interview to the Daily Star called “The Science of Sleep Explained”. I was also asked to go on the “Alive and Kicking” show on Newstalk Radio with Ciara Kelly, you can listen to the interview: What type of sleeper are you? Are you an owl or a lark?

Additional reading:

  1. Early JO, Curtis AM Immunometabolism: Is it under the eye of the clock?Semin Immunol. 2016 Oct;28(5):478-490

Annie Curtis on Twitter @curtisannie