Fantastic achievements of Lisa Dwane and Lauren Fagan

Dr. Lisa Dwane post doc with Prof. Darran O’Connor’s group, is Irish Cancer Society’s PhD Scholar of the Year 2019. She presenting her research in layman’s terms to compete for the prize at the ICS Research Awards held on Friday 15th February, at the House of Lords, Bank of Ireland College Green, Dublin 2.

Lisa also received the EACR Young Scientist Award, in the Junior category, for her research in cancer research. This Young Scientist award is granted to the two applicants with the highest scoring abstracts. This year, both recipients are RCSI researchers; the second applicant Dr. Sara Charmsaz, Dept. of Surgery, received the Senior award. Awards will be presented at the IACR Annual Conference, on Friday 22nd February, in Belfast.

Lauren Fagan (co-supervised by Dr. Oran Kennedy and Dr. Annie Curtis) was awarded Best Musculoskeletal Research Oral Presentation – Early Researcher Category for her early stage work on the chondrocyte clock and post-traumatic osteoarthritis at the Royal Academy of Medicine in Ireland Section of Bioengineering 25th Annual Conference (BinI 2019), UL, 18th – 19thJanuary 2019.

Hot Chocolate Morning for International Childhood Cancer Day

Dr Olga Piskareva’s team ran the Hot Chocolate Morning on February, 15th. Every year that day, we celebrate the International Childhood Cancer Day (ICCD) to raise awareness of childhood cancer, its consequences for children and their parents and make it as a priority for Governments and research.

Olga’s research is focused on neuroblastoma biology. This is a solid tumour of undeveloped nerves. Some forms of neuroblastoma spread quickly and become very aggressive and challenging to treat. Her team is searching for the weaknesses in cancer spread that can be targeted with drugs.

Ciara, John, Tom, Nele and Olga (l-r)

Olga teamed up with Amorino to offer authentic traditional Italian hot chocolate to raise funds for childhood cancer research charities – Children’s Medical Research Foundation/National Children’s Research Centre and the Conor Foley Neuroblastoma Cancer Research Foundation.  Research advances our knowledge and helps to develop new treatments.

A guessing game was a part of the event. Everyone had a chance to guess how many marshmallows fitted in the cell culture flask T75. The guesses ranged from as low as 95 to as high as 500. Fortunately, one of the participants gave an absolutely correct answer. Micheal Flood put on 173 and won. Her fantastic ability to guess is incredible! Congratulations!!! Well done to all!

Olga’s team raised 698.91 Euros for childhood cancer research! They thank everyone who came along and supported the Hot Chocolate Morning & the International Childhood Cancer Day 2019! They thank Amorino for delicious chocolate & tasty bites contributors!

And the winners are:

1st place – Micheal Flood (173)
2nd place – Rebecca Watkin (175)
3d place – Lisa Dwane (180)
4th place – Billy Cahill (165)
5th place – Martin Kenny (185)
6th place Brona Murphy (160)

 

Ciara, Nele, John, Tom and Olga

MCT Hosts Intergenerational Day Lab Tour

On Thursday 4 October, the Equality, Diversity and Inclusion (EDI) unit welcomed almost 30 family members of staff to RCSI St Stephen’s Green campus for the first-ever RCSI Intergenerational Day. Throughout the day, the guests had the opportunity to learn about a variety of activities at RCSI. MCT hosted a lab tour where guests were introduced to several MCT Principal Investigators who discussed their work and demonstrated how their research is carried out. Four stations focusing on the themes of Breast Cancer, Novel Cancer Therapies, Multiple Sclerosis and Circadian Rhythm and its Impact on Health were featured, led by Dr Sudipto Das, Dr Maria Morgan, Prof Tracy Robson, Dr Claire McCoy and Dr Annie Curtis. Guests were guided around the labs by the MCT Operations Team John O’Brien, Olwen Foley, Anne Grady, Mary Ledwith and Seamus McDonald. Scientists Stephanie Annett; Gillian Moore; Conor Duffy; Chiara DeSanti; Mariana  Cervantes Silva, Richard Carroll and George Timmons also volunteered on the day.
Prof Gianpiero Cavalleri contributed to the day’s activities with a talk on the Irish DNA Atlas. The MCT research projects presented were a hit with our audience evident by the number of attendees, their level of engagement and thoughtful questions. Guests included relatives of MCT staff including Mr Joseph Tighe father of Orna and Mrs McDonald & Curtis – mothers of Seamus and Annie respectively. Julia Morrow of the EDI unit commented that ‘between the MCT lab visit and Gianpiero’s talk, more than one guest commented they wish they could go back and have a more science-oriented career!’ It’s never too late we say!
Written by Maria Morgan

Mechanobiology – the ‘dark matter’ of cancer and immunity

MCT research seminar

The way we act very much depends on our surroundings; not the least on the weather conditions. In a similar way, cells in our body very much depend on what is going on around them. It has been known for a long time that the specific niches in which cells reside impact on the cellular phenotype. While most researchers have looked at chemical signals – either released into the environment or reflecting the composition of the extracellular matrix – it is becoming increasingly clear that also physical properties, such as stiffness and topography, are sensed by a wide variety of cells and influences their decisions.

It is our pleasure to welcome Prof Viola Vogel this Monday at RCSI for the MCT research seminar.

July 16th, 4.00 pm, Albert Lecture Theatre “How does the mechanobiology of extracellular matrix steer cancer progression?

Prof Vogel and her laboratory at ETH Zurich have pioneered the field of mechanobiology. Her earlier work focused on how proteins act as mechanochemical switches to transduce mechanical signals from the ECM into the cell. More recent work addresses the importance of tissue strain in the development of tumours. Prof Vogel will also share her latest results on how physical constraints affect decision making of macrophages.

Anyone who is interested in getting a different viewing angle on cancer and immunity is heartily invited! To steer your personal decision making towards attending the talk, refreshments will be served from 3.30 pm on in the Atrium.

Ingmar Schoen

Harnessing FKBPL to target cancer and vascular disease

Pathological blood vessel formation (angiogenesis), or the inability of endothelial cells to perform their physiological function (endothelial dysfunction), are defining features of disease. The endothelium actively controls vessel integrity, vascular growth and remodelling, tissue growth and metabolism, immune responses, cell adhesion, angiogenesis, haemostasis and vascular permeability.  It is, therefore, a vital and largely unexploited target for novel therapies.

Prof Tracy Robson’s team have identified and characterised a novel anti-angiogenic protein, FK506 binding protein like – FKBPL, significantly advancing our understanding of the anti-angiogenic process, in particular, how tumours recruit blood vessels to support their growth. This led to a collaborative study with Almac Discovery to develop therapeutic peptides based on FKBPL’s active domain to explore their potential in cancer by targeting the ability of tumours to recruit blood vessels to grow, invade and metastasise beyond the site of the primary tumour.  The team are also testing the ability of these peptides to sensitise tumours to current therapies and to target cancer stem cells that lead to the onset of resistance and/or recurrent disease.   Importantly, these studies led to a ‘first in man’ phase I clinical in cancer patients where the clinical candidate drug, ALM201, was very well tolerated over a wide range of doses.  Prof Robson’s team (Dr Stephanie Annett and Dr Gillian Moore) will discuss this data together with new data suggesting a strong role for FKBPL in vascular endothelial dysfunction and possible implications therefore in other diseases associated with vascular disease.

Graham Cotton, Tim Harrison, Tracy Robson, Gillian Moore, Seamus Browne and Stephanie Annett (left to right)

Daffodil Day Spinathon

On Friday, March 23rd, MCT and the Department of Physiology hosted a Spinathon for Daffodil Day, the Irish Cancer Society’s biggest fundraising day of the year. The aim of the Spinathon was to cycle the same distance as the Ring of Kerry, a total of 170 km on each bike. A number of willing participants took part on the day, including Sudipto, Lisa, George and Tony from MCT. A total of €1966 between the JustGiving.ie fundraising page and bucket collections on the day.

Final Year Royal College of Surgeons PhD Student Lisa Dwane from Clondalkin who is conducting research into hormone driven breast cancer with some daffodils for Daffodil Day and her colleagues (from left) Post Doctoral Researchers Dr Gillian Moore from Baldoyle and Dr. Brian Mooney from Bray Co. Wicklow and Dr. Stephanie Annett from Lisburn Co Antrim.
Pic Steve Humphreys
22nd March 2018

Well done to everyone involved!

A new strategy to study neuroblastoma

MCT Research Talks

Neuroblastoma is a cancer of the nervous system that primarily affects children aged 5 and younger. Although neuroblastoma accounts for only 5% of childhood cancers, it is responsible for approximately 15% of childhood cancer deaths. For children with high-risk neuroblastoma – children in which cancer has spread significantly – the outlook is extremely poor. Approximately 1 in 5 of these children will not respond to treatment, and of those that do, 50% will develop drug resistance leading, in many cases, to death.

Dr Olga Piskareva, an NCRC supported scientist and Honorary Lecturer at RCSI, has recently published a study describing a new way to grow cancer cells in the lab. Traditionally, researchers grow cancer cells in the flasks on the flat surface. This is not the way cells grow in the human body. Dr Piskareva in collaboration with Dr Curtin and Prof O’Brien has designed a new way to grow cancer cells that recreate their growth in 3 dimensions as in the human or mice body. They used special cotton wool like sponges as a new home for cancer cells and populated them with cancer cells. At the next step, they gave cells the drug at the different amount and checked what happened. In this system, cells responded only to the drug at doses used in the clinic or mice models.

This new strategy to grow cells on sponges should help to understand cancer cell behaviour better and accelerate the discovery and development of new effective drugs for neuroblastoma and other cancers. This, in turn, will make the outlook for little patients better and improve their quality of life.

Dr Olga Piskareva and her research group

More details about our research can be found in Dr Piskareva’s blog!

Reported by Olga Piskareva

FcgRIIa –an attractive target to control immune response

MCT Research Talks

Our group is a drug discovery lab currently working on the development of a novel Fc gamma receptor IIa inhibitors. FcgRIIa is a low affinity receptor for Fc portion of immunoglobulin G (IgG) and is implicated in a variety of conditions that are still mainly untreatable, such as rheumatoid arthritis, lupus, immune thrombocytopenia, sepsis. FcgRIIa is widely expressed by human innate immune cells, and is the only Fc gamma receptor found on human platelets.

Mainly over-stimulation of the FcgRIIa receptor in these conditions that leads to the progression of the disease. For example, in sepsis the platelets get activated via FcgRIIa in response to bacteria present in the blood, which results in thrombocytopenia and disseminated immune coagulopathy. This causes, not only internal haemorrhage but also formation of blood clots that block peripheral blood vessels leading to sepsis-associated limb loss, heart attacks and/or strokes. Using a targeted approach, such as pharmacophore modelling, our group has developed a small molecule compound that effectively blocks FcgRIIa-mediated platelet aggregation in vitro. In agreement with the chosen targeted approach, this compound was shown to bind to the FcgRIIa directly and possesses specificity for the FcgRII subgroup of the Fcg receptors.

Ultimately, this compound has a great potential to be used for treatment of other FcgRIIa-mediated auto-immune conditions, such as rheumatoid arthritis, lupus and an array of immune thrombocytopenia conditions.

Prof Dermot Cox, Dr Tatiana Devine and Padraig Norton

Congratulations to ‘Drs’ Shane O’Grady and Brian Mooney

Dear all,

Please join me in offering congratulations to ‘DrsShane O’Grady and Brian Mooney who successfully defended their PhD thesis yesterday:

Shane’s: Investigation of the functional roles of calcium channels, inflammatory cytokines and tumour micro-environmental factors in a human in vitro model of breast cancer calcification
Supervisor: Maria Morgan
Brian’s: The role of the anorectic neuropeptide CART in breast cancer. Supervisor: Darran O’Connor

 

 

Well done to all.

Tracy

Tracy Robson

MCT Success at RCSI Research Day 2018

Dear All,
I wanted to congratulate everyone for their significant contributions to recent RCSI Research Day.  MCT’s presence was strong on the day with a number of keys oral and poster presentations from across the four MCT research pillars. 
In particular, a huge congratulations to:
 Dr Joan Ni Gabhann for the Most Highly Cited RCSI Senior Authored Paper with Industry Collaboration 2012-2016 for her paper ‘Btk regulates macrophage polarization in response to lipopolysaccharide’.
 Rebecca Watkin (PI Prof Steven Kerrigan) and Edmund Gilbert (PI Prof Gianpiero Cavalleri)  who jointly won the best postgraduate oral presentation, sponsored by Bio-Sciences Limited, for their presentations on ‘S.aureus induced miR330-3p expression triggers abnormal permeability in an ex-vivo 2D model of sepsis’ and ‘The Irish DNA Atlas: Revealing Fine-Scale Population Structure and History within Ireland’, respectively.
 Prof James O’Donnell (ICVB) who won the Clinician CEO Innovation Award.
 Dr Ingmar Schoen for his novel Invention Disclosure.
 Camille Hurley (PI Dr Darran O’Connor) Edmund Gilbert (PI Prof Gianpiero Cavalleri)  and Conor Duffy (PI Claire McCoy) for winning inaugural RCSI International Secondment Awards.
 Finally, well done to Dr Claire McCoy for giving an inspiring and heartfelt presentation about her SFI President of Ireland Future Research Leader Award.
 Well done all. A fantastic achievement for MCT.
 Best wishes,
Tracy