Daffodil Day Bake sale – 24/03/2017

Daffodil day is marked on the annual calendar as one of the most significant days recognised for collecting donations from the Irish public to fund cancer research as well as various services provided by the Irish Cancer Society. Given the substantial amount of cancer researchers based in RCSI and in particular in MCT, a joint effort between the MCT and the Department of Physiology and Medical Physics was carried out to organise a “Bake sale” aimed to raise funds on this occasion. Dr. Sudipto Das (MCT) and Dr. Catriona Dowling (Physiology and Medical Physics) primarily organised the bake sale.

This year bake sale boasted a wide variety of baked goods prepared by various members of the staff including senior researchers and post-graduate students. One the main highlights of the bake sale was an auction for an exquisite chocolate biscuit cake with a daffodil theme baked by Ms. Ina Woods (Physiology and Medical Physics). The auction was successfully completed by selling the cake at the highest bid of 50 euro by Prof. Jochen Prehn. This year bake sale was a highly successful event, which effectively raised 800 euro with all proceeding going towards the Irish Cancer Society.

We thank everyone who made this fundraising event into an enjoyable and fruitful event.

 Reported by Sudipto Das

MCT student, Lisa Dwane, talks about her research and recent achievements

cropped-RCSI-logo-1.jpgFollowing completion of my Pharmacology degree in UCD, I began a PhD in breast cancer research under the supervision of Dr. Darran O’Connor, a career I have always been very determined to follow. My research is focused on endocrine-driven breast cancer and understanding the molecular mechanisms that drive this subtype of cancer. Currently, half of breast cancer patients that receive anti-endocrine therapies will relapse, so there is an urgent need for the identification of novel therapeutic targets. Our research is focused on the deubiquitinating enzyme USP11, which we believe plays a key role in driving endocrine-driven breast cancer. When we silence USP11 in vitro, we see a reduction in estrogen receptor activity and cell viability. During the final year of my PhD, I hope to elucidate the mechanism by which USP11 plays this role, and determine the prognostic relevance of USP11 in breast cancer. This could potentially lead to a better understanding of endocrine-driven breast cancer and with further validation, USP11 may represent a novel therapeutic target.

Lisa Dwane presents her research at the Irish Cancer Society’s Researcher of the Year Award. december, 1st, 2016. TCD
Lisa Dwane presents her research at the Irish Cancer Society’s Researcher of the Year Award. December, 1st, 2016. TCD

As a pharmacologist, I was thrilled to win best oral presentation at the Irish Association of Pharmacologists Annual Meeting! The standard of talks throughout the day were excellent, with a wide range of topics explored. I was also a finalist for the Irish Cancer Society’s Researcher of the Year Award, which took place 1st December at Trinity College Dublin. The purpose of the evening was to communicate our research to a lay audience, which proved more difficult than expected! Although I didn’t take home the award it was a very enjoyable evening, and the experience was invaluable. As scientists it is important for us to share and communicate our research with the general public and this was a skill I gained from the night!

Winners and finalists for the Irish Cancer Society’s Researcher of the Year Award
Winners and finalists for the Irish Cancer Society’s Researcher of the Year Award