miR-155, a master regulator of the immune response

MCT Research Talks – 13th February 2017

Dr. Claire McCoy

Background

I have recently arrived as a Lecturer in Biochemistry/Immunology within the Molecular and Cellular Therapeutics Department at RSCI. I am a dedicated and passionate Biochemist/Immunologist who obtained a BA (Mod) in Biochemistry from Trinity College Dublin in 2001.

Dr Claire McCoy

In 2006, I completed my PhD at the University of Dundee, Scotland after which I conducted my postdoctoral training in innate immunology with Prof Luke O’Neill. In 2010, I received a Marie Curie Mobility Fellowship where I gained scientific independence and re-located to the Hudson Institute of Medical Research in Melbourne, Australia. In 2014, I was awarded an Australian NHMRC project grant enabling me to lead an independent research team, conducting my research specifically on the regulation of microRNAs in innate immune cells, with a particular focus on inflammatory diseases such as Multiple Sclerosis.

Specific Research
My lab aims to understand how microRNAs regulate inflammation in disease. Our particular focus is how the pro-inflammatory microRNA, miR-155, plays a fundamental role in one immune cell subset called the macrophage. Macrophages are the sentinel cells of our immune system and quickly respond to infection to clear invading microbes. However, in chronic inflammatory diseases and autoimmunity, the presence of macrophages largely contributes to the damage, tissue destruction and symptoms associated with these diseases. Our research has shown that miR-155 is a key driver of this response. My lab aims to identify the molecular and functional mechanisms that underpin inflammatory macrophages, with the aim that miR-155 inhibition will lead to real therapeutic potential.
Multiple Sclerosis (MS) is a progressive degenerative disease where the prevalence in Ireland far exceeds the global average. Disease onset occurs between 20-40 years, an age critically affecting working and family life. To this day, there is no known cause and no cure for MS. Although, the early disease can be managed by current drug therapies, there is no treatment at the later progressive stages of disease, and no known treatments to repair the damage caused to the central nervous system. My research aims to uncover the role of macrophages in MS, and the contribution of miR-155 in this effect.

Awards
Claire McCoy is the recipient of a prestigious Marie Curie International fellowship and an Investigator Project Grant from the National Health and Medical Research Council (NHMRC), Australia. Altogether my research has attracted €800K in both national and international funding. I have published >21 highly cited and seminal publications in Nature Reviews Immunology, Nucleic Acids Research, Journal of Leukocyte Biology and Journal of Biological Chemistry. I am book editor for Springer Science, USA, as well as peer reviewer for international journals and funding agencies.

I will be talking about my research at 12pm TR4, Monday 13th Feb. The title of my talk will be ‘miR-155, a master regulator of the immune response’.

ALL WELCOME!

Dr. Claire McCoy

Lecturer in Biochemistry/Immunology,
Royal College of Surgeons in Ireland,
123 St Stephens Green,
Dublin 2,
Ireland.
Tel: 01-4025017
Email: clairemccoy@rcsi.ie