MCT Success at RCSI Research Day 2018

Dear All,
I wanted to congratulate everyone for their significant contributions to recent RCSI Research Day.  MCT’s presence was strong on the day with a number of keys oral and poster presentations from across the four MCT research pillars. 
In particular, a huge congratulations to:
 Dr Joan Ni Gabhann for the Most Highly Cited RCSI Senior Authored Paper with Industry Collaboration 2012-2016 for her paper ‘Btk regulates macrophage polarization in response to lipopolysaccharide’.
 Rebecca Watkin (PI Prof Steven Kerrigan) and Edmund Gilbert (PI Prof Gianpiero Cavalleri)  who jointly won the best postgraduate oral presentation, sponsored by Bio-Sciences Limited, for their presentations on ‘S.aureus induced miR330-3p expression triggers abnormal permeability in an ex-vivo 2D model of sepsis’ and ‘The Irish DNA Atlas: Revealing Fine-Scale Population Structure and History within Ireland’, respectively.
 Prof James O’Donnell (ICVB) who won the Clinician CEO Innovation Award.
 Dr Ingmar Schoen for his novel Invention Disclosure.
 Camille Hurley (PI Dr Darran O’Connor) Edmund Gilbert (PI Prof Gianpiero Cavalleri)  and Conor Duffy (PI Claire McCoy) for winning inaugural RCSI International Secondment Awards.
 Finally, well done to Dr Claire McCoy for giving an inspiring and heartfelt presentation about her SFI President of Ireland Future Research Leader Award.
 Well done all. A fantastic achievement for MCT.
 Best wishes,
Tracy

President Higgins Presents SFI Future Research Leaders Award to Dr Claire McCoy

On 25th January 2018 – President of Ireland, Michael D. Higgins, honoured Dr Claire McCoy with the SFI President of Ireland Future Research Leaders Award at a special ceremony in Áras an Uachtaráin in Dublin. Claire was among one of five recipients for this prestigious award and receives a total of €1.5m, which will support a team of 4 researchers; Dr Jennifer Dowling (Senior Post-Doctoral Researcher and hon. Lecturer), Dr Elizabeth John (Research Assistant), Ms Remsha Afzal (PhD student) and Mr Conor Duffy (PhD student).

Congratulating the awardees at the event in Áras an Uachtaráin President Michael D. Higgins said, “I am delighted to receive the wonderful scientists who have been granted SFI Future Research Leaders Awards. This award celebrates their scientific achievements and significant dedication. Their work is evidence of the ongoing world-class research being carried out in Ireland, positioning us as a global leader for scientific excellence.”

Congratulating the awardees, Prof Mark Ferguson, Director General of Science Foundation Ireland and Chief Scientific Adviser to the Government of Ireland, said “The President of Ireland Future Research Leaders Award is designed to attract to Ireland outstanding new and emerging research talent. In supporting these talented and innovative individuals, we are delighted to recognise early career researchers who have already displayed exceptional leadership potential at the frontiers of knowledge. The development of leadership skills in these researchers early in their careers is vital to ensure research and innovation in Ireland continues to progress. Our investment highlights the importance that Science Foundation Ireland places on supporting all stages of academic careers, and on the attraction and retention of star researchers.”

The research of Dr Claire McCoy is based in the Molecular and Cellular Therapeutics Department at the Royal College of Surgeons Ireland. Her research is focused on significantly advancing current therapeutic strategies for the treatment of multiple sclerosis (MS), where Ireland has the highest global incidence. Speaking of her award, she said “Obtaining this SFI Future Research Leaders award is the highlight of my career to-date. Not only does it enable me to lead a growing research team, it will also significantly contribute to the cutting-edge research being conducted at RCSI. Most importantly, it helps to place Ireland at the forefront of multiple sclerosis research worldwide.”

Pictured (l-r): Professor Mark Ferguson, Director General of Science Foundation Ireland and Chief Scientific Adviser to the Government of Ireland; President Michael D. Higgins; Dr Claire McCoy (MCT dept, RCSI), Dr Francis O’Keeffe (Claire’s Husband)

Reported by SFI communications and Dr Claire McCoy

The Irish DNA Atlas

The Irish DNA Atlas, a study of Irish genetic history and diversity led by researchers at the Royal College of Surgeons in Ireland (RCSI) and the Genealogical Society of Ireland (GSI), has recently published in findings into the genetics of Ireland in the Nature Publishing journal Scientific Reports (The Irish DNA Atlas: Revealing Fine-Scale Population Structure and History within Ireland). The Irish DNA Atlas is a cohort of individuals with four generations of ancestry from specific regions in Ireland, recruitment is organised and managed by Seamus O’Reilly at the GSI. Mr O’Reilly helps potential recruits finish, or double-check, family history and pedigree charts for the recruitment process, and mails out sample kits and paperwork for their return to RCSI.
The researchers, led by Professor Gianpiero Cavalleri at RCSI, have found; i) different groups of Irish individuals, clustered by genetic similarity alone; ii) the genetic differences between these groups are incredibly small, iii) members of each of these groups share ancestries from similar regions in Ireland (see image below); iv) a migration event(s) is observed in the north of the island of Ireland that dates somewhere in the 17th and 18th centuries and is from Britain; v) a number of genetic barriers within in Ireland, notably; in the north, and between Leinster and Munster; and finally vi) a significant level of Norwegian-like genetic ancestry throughout Ireland is observed for the first time and this is associated with a genetic migration into Ireland around the turn of the first millennium.
Using the Irish DNA Atlas in conjunction with a dataset of British individuals with regional ancestry (the People of the British Isles Study) the project was able to clusters 2,103 individuals from Ireland and Britain based on genetic similarity as 30 distinct genetic groups (see image 1 for clusters within Ireland). People within the same group are more genetically similar to each other than they are to individuals in other groups. When each Irish individual is colour coded by the group and is placed on a map based on where their great-grandparents were born, we generate a map shown below. Shown to the left are the geographic spread of the identified clusters and on the right a map of Irish kingdoms that represent proto-Provinces circa 800AD.


Analysing the Atlas, the broadest groups within Ireland are either; nearly 100% made up of Irish/Northern Irish individuals (i.e. from the island of Ireland), or are a mix between Irish and mainland British individuals. In the case of the latter, this suggests that those (Irish and mainland British) individuals have shared Irish and British genetic ancestry. The Irish individuals within these mixed groups are mainly from the north of Ireland (predominantly those who are blue crosses in the image above), and the British members are predominantly from the north of England and the south-west of Scotland.
These groups/clusters of near 100% Irish membership are interpreted as mainly ‘Gaelic’ Irish, and the genetic differences between these groups are incredibly small. The groups/clusters are grouped geographically and most are remarkably faithful to the boundaries of the Provinces in Ireland (shown on the left map). We compare these clusters and kingdoms from around 800AD in the above image for illustrative purposes. The reflection between the genetic and historical groups suggests that these Provinces and the kingdoms they represent have subtly impacted the genetic landscape of Ireland. Of particular note is within Co. Clare, which has historically been both parts of Munster and Connacht. Individuals with ancestry from Co. Clare reflect this by showing a mix of genetic groups found within both Munster and Connacht.
In addition to identifying different genetic groups within Ireland, the research sought to investigate whether previous migrations into Ireland had a detectable genetic impact on the genetics within Ireland. Having already identified groups of Irish individuals mainly in the north of Ireland who appeared to a mixture of Irish and British genetics, the researchers tested whether this could be due to a specific event creating these mixed groups. They estimated that these mixed groups are from a number of admixture events in the past, dating around the 17th and 18th centuries.
As well as migrations from Britain, the researchers asked whether evidence of migrations from wider afield, i.e. from continental Europe, could be found. A surprisingly larger amount of Scandinavian – specifically Norwegian – looking ancestry in all our Irish clusters was detected (see below image). This image shows along the horizontal axis each of the 30 genetic groups identified in Ireland and Britain. Along the vertical axis is the average proportion of the genome that’s the closest similarity is found in each of the 10 reference European populations. Ireland and Wales share a lot of French-like ancestry, but Ireland shows a lot of Norwegian-like ancestry compared to England or Wales. In fact, in this Norwegian respect, Ireland shows a similarity to Orkney.

This similar pattern of elevated Norwegian-like in Ireland and Orkney is interesting as Orkney is a region with strong evidence of Norwegian Viking genetic migration and mixture. Therefore the researchers investigated whether this Norwegian ancestry in Ireland was due to a mixture event dating from the time of the Viking activities in Ireland. They dated the ancestry to sometime around 1000 AD, which agrees with a ‘Viking Hypothesis’. This result was perhaps the most surprising using the Irish DNA Atlas, as previous work with Y-chromosomes found no evidence of Norse genetics within Ireland. However now, with whole-genome data, the extent of Norwegian mixture within Ireland is able to be shown.
This research has been funded through a Career Development Award from Science Foundation Ireland. RCSI is ranked among the top 250 (top 2%) of universities worldwide in the Times Higher Education World University Rankings (2018) and its research is ranked first in Ireland for citations. It is an international not-for-profit health sciences institution, with its headquarters in Dublin, focused on education and research to drive improvements in human health worldwide. RCSI is a signatory of the Athena SWAN Charter.

Reported by Edmund Gilbert

Japan Society for Promotion of Science – Short-term post-doctoral fellowship

Following a workshop conducted at Hoshi University, Tokyo, Japan organized through the ISCA-Japan initiative funded by SFI in October, 2015 a successful collaborative initiative was established between Dr. Sudipto Das (MCT, RCSI) and Prof. Hiroko Ikeda (Department of Neurophysiology, Hoshi University) to investigate the role of epigenetic modifications like DNA methylation in driving a neuronal dysfunction phenotype associated with Diabetes mellitus (DM). Moving this collaboration forward with support from his collaborators at Hoshi University Dr. Sudipto Das has recently received a prestigious short-term post-doctoral fellowship to further his work at Hoshi University from the Japan Society for Promotion of Science (JSPS), which would essentially cover travel, subsistence and a research consumable allowance of 562,000 Japanese Yen. As a part of this fellowship, Dr. Das will travel to Japan for a period of 1.5 months in January 2018. The successful completion of the proposed project as a part of this proposal will for the first time allow the scientific community to understand as to how epigenetic modifications like DNA methylation impact on neurological dysfunction in endocrine

The successful completion of the proposed project as a part of this proposal will for the first time allow the scientific community to understand as to how epigenetic modifications like DNA methylation impact on neurological dysfunction in endocrine related disorders such as DM, thus opening up avenues to utilize this modification to potentially predict such conditions in DM patients.

Sudipto Das

International Research and Education

Prof Tracy Robson (MCT), Prof Jochen Prehn (Physiology & Medical Physics) and Dr Darran O’Connor (MCT) have recently returned from 1 week at the College of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Soochow University, Suzhou, China where they participated in a workshop with faculty to explore research collaborations and future joint funding applications under the newly announced SFI-NSF Partnerships for International Research and Education. Supported by an Erasmus+ programme coordinated by Prof Marc Devocelle (Department of Pharmaceutical and Medicinal Chemistry), the workshop involved presentations from RCSI and Soochow investigators describing their work and discussion to identify areas of synergy. Afternoon lectures by RCSI faculty were opened to postgraduate and postdoctoral researchers from Soochow, leading to a vigorous and stimulating discussion and Prof Xinliang Mao from Soochow will visit RCSI next month to further strengthen future collaborative research opportunities. 

Left to Right: Prof Tracy Robson (MCT), Prof Jochen Prehn (Physiology & Medical Physics) and Dr Darran O’Connor (MCT)

At the invitation of the President of the British Pharmacological Society, Professor John Waddington (Emeritus, RCSI) has been elected to Fellowship of the Society; this is in recognition of his career contributions to research, education and service in the discipline of pharmacology, not just in Ireland but globally. He has recently returned from 3 weeks at the College of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Soochow University, China, under his joint appointment as a Professor of Pharmacology. While there, he continued collaborative research, gave undergraduate lectures and fostered further joint endeavours between RCSI and Soochow University, which is in the top 5% of Chinese research universities.   

Tracy Robson