The circadian protein BMAL1 in myeloid cells is a negative regulator of allergic asthma

Asthma is of particular relevance to the area of circadian control of immunity, since it is a disease with very strong clinical evidence demonstrating regulation by circadian variation. Airway hypersensitivity and asthma attacks are more common at night in humans. The molecular basis for this is unknown and no model of asthma in animals with genetic distortion of the molecular clock exists.

Asthma is under strong circadian variation. Asthma symptoms worsen at night, particularly in the early hours of the morning. Lung function fluctuates in healthy individuals over 24 h period and these fluctuations are even more pronounced in asthmatics.

In this study, we showed that mice lacking the main clock transcription factor BMAL1 in myeloid cells have increased lung inflammation demonstrated by higher numbers of eosinophils and increased IL-5 (key pathogenic cytokine in asthma that recruits eosinophils).This suggests that Bmal1 is a potent negative regulator, in myeloid cells in the context of allergic asthma. Our findings might explain the increase in asthma incidents during the night in humans when BMAL1 expression is low.

Dr. Zbigniew Zaslona from TCD (pictured here) was the lead author on the study. Both Dr. Annie Curtis (MCT) and Prof. Luke O’Neill (TCD) were joint senior authors on the paper.

The circadian protein BMAL1 in myeloid cells is a negative regulator of allergic asthma.

Zaslona Z, Case S, Early JO, Lalor SJ, McLoughlin RM, Curtis AM*, O’Neill LA* – Both authors contributed equally to this study.

Am J Physiol Lung Cell Mol Physiol. 2017 Mar 23:ajplung.00072.2017. doi: 10.1152/ajplung.00072.2017. [Epub ahead of print]